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Climate and Happiness in the Tropics

Author

Listed:
  • Arief Yusuf
  • Martin Daniel Siyaranamual
  • Aisyah Amatul Ghina
  • Megananda Suryana

Abstract

Despite the increasing number of studies on self-reported happiness, due to data availability, only a few studies from developing countries exist. Moreover, even though climate is among the most important input to human activities, only a handfull of studies explicitly associate it with self-reported wellbeing. This paper combines a survey of 17,000 individuals representing 85% of Indonesian population and GIS data on local climate to establish a causation between climate variables (temperature and rainfalls) on individual subjective well-being. We found that happiness is not associated with temperature, as expected because tropical country like Indonesia does not have much temperature variation. However, rainfall is found to significantly associated with self-reported happiness. We found that the relationship is not linear, where higher rainfall is associated with more happiness but it reduces it after some point. Policy implications are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Arief Yusuf & Martin Daniel Siyaranamual & Aisyah Amatul Ghina & Megananda Suryana, 2016. "Climate and Happiness in the Tropics," ERSA conference papers ersa16p165, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa16p165
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate; subjective-well-being; happiness; Indonesia;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R19 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Other
    • Q29 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Other

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