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The Effectiveness of Health Expenditure on the Proximate and Ultimate Goals of Healthcare in Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Ssozi, John
  • Amlani, Shirin

Abstract

Using the General Method of Moments technique we examine the effectiveness of health expenditure from 1995 to 2011 in 43 nations of Sub-Saharan Africa. Health expenditure is broken into resources to government and non-government entities, private not out-of-pocket, and private out-of-pocket, and we find that while it has a higher effect on the proximate targets such as immunization, malaria, HIV/AIDS, and nutrition, it has a lower effect on the ultimate goals which are life expectancy, infant, and child mortality. Public health expenditure would become more effective if public service delivery improves, in addition to more female education and inclusive healthcare systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Ssozi, John & Amlani, Shirin, 2015. "The Effectiveness of Health Expenditure on the Proximate and Ultimate Goals of Healthcare in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 165-179.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:76:y:2015:i:c:p:165-179
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2015.07.010
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    Cited by:

    1. Fiorini, Matteo & Hoekman, Bernard, 2018. "Services trade policy and sustainable development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1-12.
    2. Bousmah, Marwân-al-Qays & Ventelou, Bruno & Abu-Zaineh, Mohammad, 2016. "Medicine and democracy: The importance of institutional quality in the relationship between health expenditure and health outcomes in the MENA region," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 120(8), pages 928-935.
    3. Asongu, Simplice & Nwachukwu, Jacinta, 2016. "Mobile Phones in the Diffusion of Knowledge and Persistence in Inclusive Human Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 73091, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised May 2016.
    4. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "Not all that glitters is gold: ICT and inclusive human development in Sub-Saharan Africa," International Journal of Happiness and Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 3(4), pages 303-322.
    5. Simplice A. Asongu, 2018. "Conditional Determinants of Mobile Phones Penetration and Mobile Banking in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 9(1), pages 81-135, March.
    6. Asongu, Simplice & Boateng, Agyenim & Akamavi, Raphael, 2016. "Mobile Phone Innovation and Inclusive Human Development: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 75046, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Asongu, Simplice A. & Nwachukwu, Jacinta C., 2016. "The role of governance in mobile phones for inclusive human development in Sub-Saharan Africa," Technovation, Elsevier, vol. 55, pages 1-13.

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