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Working Paper 91 - Health Expenditures and Health Outcomes in Africa

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This paper provides econometric evidence linking African countries’ per capita total as well as government health expenditures and per capita income to two health outcomes: infant mortality and under-five mortality. This relationship is examined, using data from 47 African countries between 1999 and 2004. Health expenditures have a statistically significant effect on infant mortality and under-five mortality. The magnitude of our elasticity estimates are in consonance to those reported in the literature. For African countries, our results imply that total health expenditures (as well as the public component) are certainly important contributor to health outcomes. In addition, we find that both infant and under-five mortality are positively and significantly associated with Sub-Saharan Africa. The reverse is true for North Africa. While ethnolinguistic fractionalization and HIV prevalence positively and significantly affect the health outcomes, higher numbers physicians and female literacy significantly reduce these health outcomes. These results have important implications for attaining the targets envisioned by the Millennium Development Goals. The data implications are also discussed.

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  • John Anyanwu & Andrew E. O. Erhijakpor, 2007. "Working Paper 91 - Health Expenditures and Health Outcomes in Africa," Working Paper Series 226, African Development Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:adb:adbwps:226
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    2. Allen, Summer L. & Badiane, Ousmane & Ulimwengu, John M., 2012. "Government expenditures, social outcomes, and marginal productivity of agricultural inputs: a case study for Tanzania," IFPRI discussion papers 1172, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Deluna, Roperto Jr & Peralta, Tiffany Faith, 2014. "Public Health Expenditures, Income and Health Outcomes in the Philippines," MPRA Paper 60115, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Fatima Boussalem & Zina Boussalem & Abdelaziz Taiba, 2014. "The Relationship between public spending on health and economic growth in Algeria: Testing for Cointegration and Causality," Proceedings of International Academic Conferences 0101004, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.

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