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Nominal Anchor Exchange Rate Policies as a Domestic Distortion

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  • Anne O. Krueger

Abstract

This paper analyzes a nominal anchor exchange rate policy as a domestic distortion, in the tradition of international trade theory. It is shown that, in addition to the problems of sustainability and exit pinpointed in the exchange rate literature, a nominal anchor exchange rate policy, while in force, drives a wedge between the domestic and the international intertemporal marginal rates of substitution. The welfare cost of the Mexican use of the nominal anchor exchange rate policy prior to December 1994 is then estimated.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne O. Krueger, 1997. "Nominal Anchor Exchange Rate Policies as a Domestic Distortion," NBER Working Papers 5968, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:5968
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    1. Calvo, Guillermo A. & Reinhart, Carmen M. & Vegh, Carlos A., 1995. "Targeting the real exchange rate: theory and evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 97-133, June.
    2. Sergio Rebelo & Carlos A. Vegh, 1995. "Real Effects of Exchange-Rate-Based Stabilization: An Analysis of Competing Theories," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1995, Volume 10, pages 125-188 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Corbo, Vittorio & de Melo, Jaime, 1987. "Lessons from the Southern Cone Policy Reforms," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 2(2), pages 111-142, July.
    4. Sebastian Edwards, 1996. "A Tale of Two Crises: Chile and Mexico," NBER Working Papers 5794, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Michael Bruno & Stanley Fischer, 1990. "Seigniorage, Operating Rules, and the High Inflation Trap," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(2), pages 353-374.
    6. John C. Hause, 1966. "The Welfare Costs of Disequilibrium Exchange Rates," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 333-333.
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    Cited by:

    1. John Anyanwu & Andrew E. O. Erhijakpor, 2007. "Working Paper 92 - Education Expenditures and School Enrolment in Africa: Illustrations from Nigeria and Other SANE Countries," Working Paper Series 227, African Development Bank.
    2. Sanjaya Acharya, 2014. "Trade liberalisation in fixed and flexible exchange rate regimes: a CGE analysis for Nepal," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 129-148, June.
    3. Debapriya Bhattacharya & Shouro Dasgupta & Dwitiya Jawher Neethi, 2012. "Assessing the Impact of the Global Economic and Financial Crisis on Bangladesh: An Intervention Analysis," CPD Working Paper 97, Centre for Policy Dialogue (CPD).
    4. Drabek, Zdenek & Brada, Josef C., 1998. "Exchange Rate Regimes and the Stability of Trade Policy in Transition Economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 642-668, December.
    5. Robertson, Raymond, 2003. "Exchange rates and relative wages: evidence from Mexico," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 25-48, March.
    6. John Anyanwu & Andrew E. O. Erhijakpor, 2007. "Working Paper 91 - Health Expenditures and Health Outcomes in Africa," Working Paper Series 226, African Development Bank.

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