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Credible Liberalizations and International Capital Flows: The "Overborrowing Syndrome"

In: Financial Deregulation and Integration in East Asia

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  • Ronald I. McKinnon
  • Huw Pill

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  • Ronald I. McKinnon & Huw Pill, 1996. "Credible Liberalizations and International Capital Flows: The "Overborrowing Syndrome"," NBER Chapters, in: Financial Deregulation and Integration in East Asia, pages 7-50, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8557
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ito, Takatoshi & Krueger, Anne O. (ed.), 1995. "Growth Theories in Light of the East Asian Experience," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226386706, March.
    2. Takatoshi Ito & Anne O. Krueger, 1995. "Growth Theories in Light of the East Asian Experience," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number ito_95-2, March.
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