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Food Aid Dependency in Northeastern Ethiopia: Myth or Reality?

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  • Little, Peter D.

Abstract

Summary Food aid dependency among Ethiopian farmers frequently is claimed with serious policy impacts. This article explores this assertion with reference to South Wollo, Ethiopia, one of the country's largest recipients of food aid. It uses household economic and ethnographic data from the 1999-2000 and 2002-03 droughts when food aid imports were very high. By examining patterns of food aid distribution and resource allocation among groups of food aid recipients and non-recipients, the article suggests that food aid has not encouraged dependency-like behaviors. It suggests that few farmers would be foolhardy enough to significantly alter their actions, since food aid delivery is too uncertain and poorly timed.

Suggested Citation

  • Little, Peter D., 2008. "Food Aid Dependency in Northeastern Ethiopia: Myth or Reality?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 860-874, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:36:y:2008:i:5:p:860-874
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2003. "Food Aid and Child Nutrition in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1309-1324, July.
    2. Stefan Dercon & Pramila Krishnan, 2003. "Food aid and informal insurance," CSAE Working Paper Series 2003-01, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    3. Christopher Barrett & Daniel Clay, 2003. "How Accurate is Food-for-Work Self-Targeting in the Presence of Imperfect Factor Markets? Evidence from Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(5), pages 152-180.
    4. Jayne, T. S. & Strauss, John & Yamano, Takashi & Molla, Daniel, 2001. "Giving to the Poor? Targeting of Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 887-910, May.
    5. Kay Sharp & Stephen Devereux, 2004. "Destitution in Wollo (Ethiopia): chronic poverty as a crisis of household and community livelihoods," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 227-247.
    6. Peter Little & M. Priscilla Stone & Tewodaj Mogues & A. Peter Castro & Workneh Negatu, 2006. "'Moving in place': Drought and poverty dynamics in South Wollo, Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 200-225.
    7. Barrett, Christopher B, 2001. "Does Food Aid Stabilize Food Availability?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(2), pages 335-349, January.
    8. Clay, Daniel C. & Molla, Daniel & Habtewold, Debebe, 1999. "Food aid targeting in Ethiopia: A study of who needs it and who gets it," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 391-409, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:wdevel:v:116:y:2019:i:c:p:54-65 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Ferrière, Nathalie & Suwa-Eisenmann, Akiko, 2015. "Does Food Aid Disrupt Local Food Market? Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 114-131.
    3. repec:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:4:p:1380-1400 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Andersson, Camilla & Mekonnen, Alemu & Stage, Jesper, 2011. "Impacts of the Productive Safety Net Program in Ethiopia on livestock and tree holdings of rural households," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 119-126, January.
    5. Hoddinott, John & Margolies, Amy, 2012. "Mapping the Impacts of Food Aid: Current Knowledge and Future Directions," WIDER Working Paper Series 034, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Abebaw, Degnet & Fentie, Yibeltal & Kassa, Belay, 2010. "The impact of a food security program on household food consumption in Northwestern Ethiopia: A matching estimator approach," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 286-293, August.
    7. Villegas, Laura & Smith, Vincent H. & Atwood, Joe & Belasco, Eric, 2016. "Does Participation In Public Works Programs Encourage Fertilizer Use In Rural Ethiopia?," International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics (IJFAEC), Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Department of Economics and Finance, vol. 4(2), pages 1-24, April.
    8. repec:eee:wdevel:v:107:y:2018:i:c:p:87-97 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:bla:agecon:v:49:y:2018:i:1:p:13-24 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Devereux, Stephen, 2016. "Social protection for enhanced food security in sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 52-62.
    11. Araya, Girma Behe & Holden , Stein T., 2017. "Is Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program Enhancing Dependency?," CLTS Working Papers 5/17, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Centre for Land Tenure Studies, revised 21 Oct 2019.
    12. Alem, Yonas & Broussard, Nzinga H., 2013. "Do Safety Nets Promote Technology Adoption? Panel data evidence from rural Ethiopia," Working Papers in Economics 556, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

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