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Food Aid Dependency in Northeastern Ethiopia: Myth or Reality?

  • Little, Peter D.
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    Summary Food aid dependency among Ethiopian farmers frequently is claimed with serious policy impacts. This article explores this assertion with reference to South Wollo, Ethiopia, one of the country's largest recipients of food aid. It uses household economic and ethnographic data from the 1999-2000 and 2002-03 droughts when food aid imports were very high. By examining patterns of food aid distribution and resource allocation among groups of food aid recipients and non-recipients, the article suggests that food aid has not encouraged dependency-like behaviors. It suggests that few farmers would be foolhardy enough to significantly alter their actions, since food aid delivery is too uncertain and poorly timed.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

    Volume (Year): 36 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 5 (May)
    Pages: 860-874

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:36:y:2008:i:5:p:860-874
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    1. Dercon, Stefan & Krishnan, Pramila, 2003. "Food Aid and Informal Insurance," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2003. "Food Aid and Child Nutrition in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1309-1324, July.
    3. Barrett, Christopher B., 1999. "Does Food Aid Stabilize Food Availability?," Working Papers 14757, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    4. Clay, Daniel C. & Molla, Daniel & Habtewold, Debebe, 1999. "Food aid targeting in Ethiopia: A study of who needs it and who gets it," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 391-409, August.
    5. Christopher Barrett & Daniel Clay, 2003. "How Accurate is Food-for-Work Self-Targeting in the Presence of Imperfect Factor Markets? Evidence from Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(5), pages 152-180.
    6. Jayne, T. S. & Strauss, John & Yamano, Takashi & Molla, Daniel, 2001. "Giving to the Poor? Targeting of Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 887-910, May.
    7. Kay Sharp & Stephen Devereux, 2004. "Destitution in Wollo (Ethiopia): chronic poverty as a crisis of household and community livelihoods," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 227-247.
    8. Peter Little & M. Priscilla Stone & Tewodaj Mogues & A. Peter Castro & Workneh Negatu, 2006. "'Moving in place': Drought and poverty dynamics in South Wollo, Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 200-225.
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