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'Moving in place': Drought and poverty dynamics in South Wollo, Ethiopia

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Listed:
  • Peter Little
  • M. Priscilla Stone
  • Tewodaj Mogues
  • A. Peter Castro
  • Workneh Negatu

Abstract

This article discusses the impact of drought on poverty dynamics in the South Wollo area of northeastern Ethiopia. Using both survey and anthropological/qualitative data covering a six-year period, the paper assesses which households were able to hold on to assets and recover from the 1999-2000 drought and which were not. It suggests that while the incidence of poverty changed very little during 1997 to 2003 despite the occurrence of a major drought, the fortunes of the poorest improved, but not enough to keep them from poverty. The study concludes by asking how current policies affect patterns of poverty and inequality and what might be done to improve welfare in South Wollo.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Little & M. Priscilla Stone & Tewodaj Mogues & A. Peter Castro & Workneh Negatu, 2006. "'Moving in place': Drought and poverty dynamics in South Wollo, Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 200-225.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:42:y:2006:i:2:p:200-225 DOI: 10.1080/00220380500405287
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hoddinott, John & Quisumbing, Agnes, 2003. "Methods for microeconometric risk and vulnerability assessments," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 29138, The World Bank.
    2. Philippa Bevan & Sandra Fullerton Joireman, 1997. "The perils of measuring poverty: Identifying the 'poor' in rural Ethiopia," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 315-343.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Carter & Peter Little & Tewodaj Mogues & Workneh Negatu, 2005. "Shocks, Sensitivity and Resilience: Tracking the Economic Impacts of Environmental Disaster on Assets in Ethiopia and Honduras," Development and Comp Systems 0511029, EconWPA.
    2. Carter, Michael R. & Little, Peter D. & Mogues, Tewodaj & Negatu, Workneh, 2007. "Poverty Traps and Natural Disasters in Ethiopia and Honduras," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 835-856, May.
    3. Juliana Helo, 2011. "Una evaluación de los programas de estabilización para la población desplazada en Colombia - estimación de un modelo estructural," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 008915, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    4. Kriel, Antoinette & Randall, Sara & Coast, Ernestina & de Clercq, Bernadene, 2014. "From design to practice: how can large-scale household surveys better represent the complexities of the social units under investigation?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 59737, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. De Alwis, Diana & Noy, Ilan, 2016. "Sri Lankan households a decade after the Indian Ocean tsunami," Working Paper Series 5281, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    6. Dillon, Andrew & Quiñones, Esteban J., 2010. "Asset dynamics in Northern Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 1049, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Asfaw, Solomon & Savastano, Sara, 2015. "Topic: Building Resilience to Climate Change Through Social Protection and Climate-Smart Agriculture: Synergies and Trade-offs," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 210963, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Azreen Karim & Ilan Noy, 2016. "Poverty And Natural Disasters — A Qualitative Survey Of The Empirical Literature," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(01), pages 1-36, March.
    9. Little, Peter D. & Debsu, Dejene Negassa & Tiki, Waktole, 2014. "How pastoralists perceive and respond to market opportunities: The case of the Horn of Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P2), pages 389-397.
    10. Bogale, Ayalneh & Korf, Benedikt, 2009. "Analysis of poverty and its covariates among smallholder farmers in the eastern Hararghe highlands of Ethiopia," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51469, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    11. Mirza Nomman Ahmed & Michael Schmitz, 2011. "Economic assessment of the impact of climate change on the agriculture of Pakistan," Business and Economic Horizons (BEH), Prague Development Center, vol. 4(1), pages 1-12, January.
    12. Ana María Ibañez & Andrés Moya, 2010. "Do Conflicts Create Poverty Traps? Asset Losses and Recovery for Displaced Households in Colombia," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Crime: Lessons for and from Latin America, pages 137-172 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Renkow, Mitch & Slade, Roger, 2013. "An assessment of IFPRI's work in Ethiopia 1995-2010: Ideology, influence, and idiosyncrasy," Impact assessments 36, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. World Bank, 2012. "Liberia Poverty Note : Tracking the Dimensions of Poverty," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12320, The World Bank.
    15. Bizimana, Jean-Claude & Bessler, David A. & Angerer, Jay P., 2016. "The 2010-2011 Drought Impacts on Cattle Market Integration in the Horn of Africa: A preliminary Evaluation using VAR and Structural Break Analysis," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 229991, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    16. Little, Peter D., 2008. "Food Aid Dependency in Northeastern Ethiopia: Myth or Reality?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 860-874, May.
    17. Zereyesus, Yacob & Tsiboe, Francis & Embaye, Weldensie, 2016. "The Effect of Shocks and Remittances on Household’s Vulnerability to Food Poverty: Evidence from Bangladesh," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236199, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    18. Ngigi, Marther W. & Birner, Regina, 2013. "Shocks, livestock assets and climate change adaptation in Kenya," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161468, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    19. Asfaw, Solomon & McCarthy, Nancy & Paolantonio, Adriana & Cavatassi, Romina & Amare, Mulubrhan & Lipper, Leslie, 2015. "Diversification, Climate Risk and Vulnerability to Poverty: Evidence from Rural Malawi," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 230216, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    20. Thiede, Brian C., 2014. "Rainfall Shocks and Within-Community Wealth Inequality: Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 181-193.
    21. Okayasu, Tomoo & Okuro, Toshiya & Jamsran, Undarmaa & Takeuchi, Kazuhiko, 2010. "An intrinsic mechanism for the co-existence of different survival strategies within mobile pastoralist communities," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 103(4), pages 180-186, May.

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