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Socio-demographics, implicit attitudes, explicit attitudes, and sustainable consumption in supermarket shopping

Author

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  • Panzone, Luca
  • Hilton, Denis
  • Sale, Laura
  • Cohen, Doron

Abstract

The aim of this research is to examine whether socio-demographics, implicit and explicit attitudes towards the environment predict sustainable consumer behaviour, measured using supermarket loyalty card data. The article uses an Implicit Association Test (IAT) and Likert scales to gauge implicit and explicit attitudes towards sustainable consumption in a real consumer sample, and measures demographic characteristics of participants. Results indicate that level of education is a key predictor of an aggregate measure of sustainable consumption, with a small part of this influence mediated by level of explicit environmental concern for climate change. Econometric modelling shows that explicit and implicit attitudes influence consumer decisions differently in specific food categories. Results, obtained with real consumer data, call into question the accepted socio-demographic profile of the green consumer and help identify conditions under which pro-environmental attitudes predict sustainable consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Panzone, Luca & Hilton, Denis & Sale, Laura & Cohen, Doron, 2016. "Socio-demographics, implicit attitudes, explicit attitudes, and sustainable consumption in supermarket shopping," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 77-95.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:55:y:2016:i:c:p:77-95
    DOI: 10.1016/j.joep.2016.02.004
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    Cited by:

    1. Edouard Civel & Nathaly Cruz-Garcia, 2018. "Green, yellow or red lemons? Framed field experiment on houses energy labels perception," EconomiX Working Papers 2018-35, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    2. Blankenberg, Ann-Kathrin & Alhusen, Harm, 2018. "On the determinants of pro-environmental behavior: A guide for further investigations," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 350, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    3. Kwarteng Michael Adu & Pilik Michal, 2016. "Exploring Consumers’ Propensity For Online Shopping In A Developing Country: A Demographic Perspective," International Journal of Entrepreneurial Knowledge, VSP Ostrava, a. s., vol. 4(1), pages 90-103, June.
    4. Edouard Civel & Nathaly Cruz, 2018. "Green, yellow or red lemons? Artefactual field experiment on houses energy labels perception," Working Papers 1809, Chaire Economie du climat.
    5. repec:jec:journl:v:13:y:2017:i:2:p:167-191 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:jbrese:v:86:y:2018:i:c:p:333-343 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Qinxin Guo & Enci Wang & Yongyou Nie & Junyi Shen, 2018. "Revisiting the Impact of Impure Public Goods on Consumers' Prosocial Behavior: A Lab Experiment in Shanghai," Discussion Paper Series DP2018-22, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sustainable consumption; Implicit and explicit attitudes; Grocery shopping; Mediation analysis; Almost ideal demand system;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • Q59 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Other

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