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Dual-process theories of decision-making: A selective survey

Listed author(s):
  • Brocas, Isabelle
  • Carrillo, Juan D.

Brain modularity is a key concept in neuroscience. It challenges the common view of the single coherent self adopted in many disciplines, including economics. Multi-process theories of decision-making rely on the existence of several brain systems interacting with each other to revisit standard paradigms of choice, propose choices that fit the behavioral data better, and offer testable predictions. In this paper, we present a selective review of our recent research in this area. We focus on constrained optimization models rather than the computational models extensively used in neuroscience.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167487013000184
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Psychology.

Volume (Year): 41 (2014)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 45-54

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Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:41:y:2014:i:c:p:45-54
DOI: 10.1016/j.joep.2013.01.004
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/joep

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