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A Triple Test for Behavioral Economics Models and Public Health Policy

  • Ryota Nakamura

    (University of East Anglia)

  • Marc Suhrcke

    (University of East Anglia)

  • Daniel John Zizzo

    (University of East Anglia)

We propose a triple test to evaluate the usefulness of behavioral economics models for public health policy. Test 1 is whether the model provides reasonably new insights. Test 2 is on whether these have been properly applied to policy settings. Test 3 is whether they are corroborated by evidence. Where a test is not passed, this may point to directions for needed further research. We exemplify by considering the cases of social interactions models, self-control models and, in relation to health message framing, prospect theory; out of these, only a correctly applied prospect theory fully passes the tests at present.

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Paper provided by School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. in its series Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) with number 14-01.

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Date of creation: 2014
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Handle: RePEc:uea:wcbess:14-01
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