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Effect of large-scale social interactions on body weight

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  • Auld, M. Christopher

Abstract

I estimate models of endogenous social interactions in body weight at the county and state levels. The results show that dispersion in body weight across time and space in the U.S. is not clearly excessive, and that much of this variation can be attributed to observable individual and regional characteristics. Models exploiting variants of methods proposed by Glaeser et al. (2003), fixed effects, instrumental variable and split-sample instrumental variable methods to address endogeneity suggest that there are not large social multipliers on body weight outcomes. The evidence suggests there may be small multipliers on BMI, obesity, and morbid obesity. There is no evidence that underweight is subject to a social multiplier. The results are sensitive to specification.

Suggested Citation

  • Auld, M. Christopher, 2011. "Effect of large-scale social interactions on body weight," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 303-316, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:30:y:2011:i:2:p:303-316
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Strulik, Holger, 2014. "A mass phenomenon: The social evolution of obesity," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 113-125.
    2. repec:kap:atlecj:v:46:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s11293-018-9602-x is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Guccio, C. & Lisi, D., 2014. "Social interactions in inappropriate behavior for childbirth services: Theory and evidence from the Italian hospital sector," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 14/28, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Anne Laferrere, 2014. ""Personal network" and retirement: Is retirement bad for friendship and good for family relationships?," Working Papers 2014-37, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    5. Bénédicte Apouey & Gabriel Picone, 2014. "Social Interactions And Malaria Preventive Behaviors In Sub‐Saharan Africa," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(9), pages 994-1012, September.
    6. Georgia S. Papoutsi & Andreas C. Drichoutis & Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr., 2013. "The Causes Of Childhood Obesity: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(4), pages 743-767, September.
    7. Dang, Rui, 2015. "Spillover effects of local human capital stock on adult obesity: Evidence from German neighborhoods," Ruhr Economic Papers 585, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    8. Ryota Nakamura & Marc Suhrcke & Daniel John Zizzo, 2017. "A triple test for behavioral economics models and public health policy," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 83(4), pages 513-533, December.
    9. Bénédicte H. Apouey & Gabriel Picone, 2014. "Social Interactions and Malaria Preventive Behaviors in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers halshs-00940084, HAL.
    10. Guccio, Calogero & Lisi, Domenico, 2016. "Thus do all. Social interactions in inappropriate behavior for childbirth services in a highly decentralized healthcare system," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-17.

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