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Racial Difference in the Determinants of Smoking Onset


  • DeCicca, Philip
  • Kenkel, Donald
  • Mathios, Alan


The large differences in youth smoking behavior across ethnic and racial groups are often overlooked in debates about prevention. This study examines how the determinants of the onset of smoking vary by race and ethnicity. Academic success is strongly associated with lower smoking rates among white youth, but this is not as true for Hispanics and African-Americans. Cultural assimilation may be an important determinant of smoking for Hispanics. Price increases do not appear to reduce smoking onset among white youth, but the results provide some support that higher prices will reduce smoking among Hispanic and African-American youth. Copyright 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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  • DeCicca, Philip & Kenkel, Donald & Mathios, Alan, 2000. "Racial Difference in the Determinants of Smoking Onset," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 21(2-3), pages 311-340, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jrisku:v:21:y:2000:i:2-3:p:311-40

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ji Yan & Sally Brocksen, 2013. "Adolescent risk perception, substance use, and educational attainment," Journal of Risk Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(8), pages 1037-1055, September.
    2. G. Guindon, 2014. "The impact of tobacco prices on smoking onset in Vietnam: duration analyses of retrospective data," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(1), pages 19-39, January.
    3. Johanna Catherine MacLean & Asia Sikora Kessler & Donald S. Kenkel, 2016. "Cigarette Taxes and Older Adult Smoking: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(4), pages 424-438, April.
    4. Nonnemaker, James M. & Farrelly, Matthew C., 2011. "Smoking initiation among youth: The role of cigarette excise taxes and prices by race/ethnicity and gender," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 560-567, May.
    5. Lundborg, Petter, 2005. "Social capital and substance use among Swedish adolescents--an explorative study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(6), pages 1151-1158, September.
    6. Donald S. Kenkel & Robert R. Reed III & Ping Wang, 2002. "Rational Addiction, Peer Externalities and Long Run Effects of Public Policy," NBER Working Papers 9249, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Philip DeCicca & Donald Kenkel & Alan Mathios & Yoon-Jeong Shin & Jae-Young Lim, 2008. "Youth smoking, cigarette prices, and anti-smoking sentiment," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(6), pages 733-749.
    8. Jason Fletcher & Jody Sindelar, 2012. "The effects of family stressors on substance use initiation in adolescence," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 99-114, March.
    9. repec:kap:theord:v:83:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11238-017-9625-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Ferrando-Latorre, Sandra, 2017. "Risky consumption and intergenerational mobility: a research program in a family context," MPRA Paper 79777, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Rosa Duarte & Jose Julián Escario & José Alberto Molina, 2011. "Peer Effects, Unobserved Factors And Risk Behaviours In Adolescence," Revista de Economia Aplicada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Estructura Economica y Economia Publica, vol. 19(1), pages 125-151, Spring.
    12. Ryo Nakajima, 2007. "Measuring Peer Effects on Youth Smoking Behaviour," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(3), pages 897-935.
    13. Dinno, Alexis & Glantz, Stanton, 2009. "Tobacco control policies are egalitarian: A vulnerabilities perspective on clean indoor air laws, cigarette prices, and tobacco use disparities," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(8), pages 1439-1447, April.
    14. Ferrando, Sandra, 2017. "Risky consumption among adolescents: A survey for Spain," MPRA Paper 79465, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Rosa Duarte & José Escario & José Molina, 2006. "The psychosocial behaviour of young Spanish smokers," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 176-189, June.
    16. Jeffrey E. Harris & Beatriz Lopez-Valcarcel, 2004. "Asymmetric Social Interaction in Economics: Cigarette Smoking Among Young People in the United States, 1992-1999," NBER Working Papers 10409, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Ryota Nakamura & Marc Suhrcke & Daniel John Zizzo, 2017. "A triple test for behavioral economics models and public health policy," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 83(4), pages 513-533, December.
    18. Duarte, Rosa & Escario, José-Julián & Molina, José Alberto, 2007. "Peer Effects, Unobserved Factors and Risk Behaviours: An Analysis of Alcohol Abuse and Truancy among Adolescents," IZA Discussion Papers 2589, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    19. Campaña, Juan Carlos, 2017. "¿Pueden llegar a ser adictivos los comportamientos juveniles sedentarios en el hogar? Un programa de investigación con respuestas conceptuales y evidencia empírica
      [Can sedentary youth behaviors be
      ," MPRA Paper 81401, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Jason M. Fletcher & Partha Deb & Jody L. Sindelar, 2009. "Tobacco Use, Taxation and Self Control in Adolescence," NBER Working Papers 15130, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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