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The design of an environmental index of sustainable food consumption: A pilot study using supermarket data

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  • Panzone, Luca A.
  • Wossink, Ada
  • Southerton, Dale

Abstract

Monitoring of the environmental impacts of consumption is necessary for the evaluation of current performance and to support the understanding of how initiatives for change can be implemented. We discuss design issues and methodology for an Environmentally Sensitive Shopper (ESS) index to measure the environmental sustainability of food consumption at the household level. The ESS index is based on revealed consumer preferences and uses scanner data provided by the largest UK food retailer. As a pilot illustration of the methodology, we use the index to identify environmentally critical periods during the calendar year.

Suggested Citation

  • Panzone, Luca A. & Wossink, Ada & Southerton, Dale, 2013. "The design of an environmental index of sustainable food consumption: A pilot study using supermarket data," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 44-55.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:94:y:2013:i:c:p:44-55
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2013.07.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Panzone, Luca & Hilton, Denis & Sale, Laura & Cohen, Doron, 2016. "Socio-demographics, implicit attitudes, explicit attitudes, and sustainable consumption in supermarket shopping," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 77-95.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sustainable consumption; Sustainability index; Revealed preferences; Food;

    JEL classification:

    • C43 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Index Numbers and Aggregation
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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