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Energy Conservation “Nudges” And Environmentalist Ideology: Evidence From A Randomized Residential Electricity Field Experiment

  • Dora L. Costa
  • Matthew E. Kahn

“Nudges” are being widely promoted to encourage energy conservation. We show that the popular electricity conservation “nudge” of providing feedback to households on own and peers’ home electricity usage in a home electricity report is two to four times more effective with political liberals than with conservatives. Political conservatives are more likely than liberals to opt out of receiving the home electricity report and to report disliking the report. Our results suggest that energy conservation nudges need to be targeted to be most effective.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jeea.2013.11.issue-3
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Article provided by European Economic Association in its journal Journal of the European Economic Association.

Volume (Year): 11 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (06)
Pages: 680-702

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Handle: RePEc:bla:jeurec:v:11:y:2013:i:3:p:680-702
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