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The demand for a healthy diet: estimating the almost ideal demand system with infrequency of purchase

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  • Richard Tiffin
  • Matthieu Arnoult

Abstract

A Bayesian method of estimating multivariate sample selection models is introduced and applied to the estimation of a demand system for food in the UK to account for censoring arising from infrequency of purchase. We show how it is possible to impose identifying restrictions on the sample selection equations and that, unlike a maximum likelihood framework, the imposition of adding up at both latent and observed levels is straightforward. Our results emphasise the role played by low incomes and socio-economic circumstances in leading to poor diets and also indicate that the presence of children in a household has a negative impact on dietary quality. Oxford University Press and Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics 2010; all rights reserved. For permissions, please email journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

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  • Richard Tiffin & Matthieu Arnoult, 2010. "The demand for a healthy diet: estimating the almost ideal demand system with infrequency of purchase," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 37(4), pages 501-521, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:erevae:v:37:y:2010:i:4:p:501-521
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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Widenhorn & Klaus Salhofer, 2014. "Price Sensitivity Within and Across Retail Formats," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(2), pages 184-194, March.
    2. Kasteridis, Panagiotis & Yen, Steven, 2012. "U.S. demand for organic and conventional vegetables: a Bayesian censored system approach," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 56(3), September.
    3. Akerele, Dare & Tiffin, R. & Srinivasan, C. S., 2013. "Household Food Demand in Nigeria: an Application of Multivariate Double-hurdle Model," 87th Annual Conference, April 8-10, 2013, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 158700, Agricultural Economics Society.
    4. Simone Salotti & Letizia Montinari & Antonio F. Amores & José Manuel Rueda-Cantuche, 2015. "Total expenditure elasticity of non-durable consumption of European households," JRC Working Papers JRC94405, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    5. Adelina Gschwandtner, 2014. "The Organic Food Premium: A Canterbury Tale," Studies in Economics 1411, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    6. Adelina Gschwandtner & Michael Burton, 2017. "The Willingness to Pay for Organic Attributes in the UK," Studies in Economics 1702, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    7. France, Caillavet & Adélaide, Fadhuile & Véronique, Nichèle, 2014. "Taxing Animal Products: Protein Demand under Environmental Pressure and Social Impact in France," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 169974, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Panzone, Luca & Hilton, Denis & Sale, Laura & Cohen, Doron, 2016. "Socio-demographics, implicit attitudes, explicit attitudes, and sustainable consumption in supermarket shopping," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 77-95.
    9. Ariane Kehlbacher & Richard Tiffin & Adam Briggs & Mike Berners-Lee & Peter Scarborough, 2016. "The distributional and nutritional impacts and mitigation potential of emission-based food taxes in the UK," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 137(1), pages 121-141, July.
    10. Ogundari, Kolawole & Arifalo, Sadiat Funmilayo, 0. "Determinants of Household Demand for Fresh Fruit and Vegetable in Nigeria: A Double Hurdle Approach," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 52.
    11. Moro, Daniele & Sckokai, Paolo, 2013. "The impact of decoupled payments on farm choices: Conceptual and methodological challenges," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 28-38.
    12. Eivind Hestvik Braekkan & Sverre Braathen Thyholdt, 2014. "The Bumpy Road of Demand Growth--An Application to Atlantic Salmon," Marine Resource Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(4), pages 339-350.
    13. Silva, Andres & Garcia, Marian & Bailey, Alastair, 2012. "The Impact of Child Obesity News on Household Food Expenditure in the United Kingdom," 2012 AAEA/EAAE Food Environment Symposium, May 30-31, Boston, MA 123526, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    14. Salois, Matthew J. & Tiffin, J. Richard, 2011. "The Impacts of Fat Taxes and Thin Subsidies on Nutrient Intakes," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108789, Agricultural Economics Society.
    15. Lin, Biing-Hwan & Ver Ploeg, Michele & Kasteridis, Panagiotis & Yen, Steven T., 2014. "The roles of food prices and food access in determining food purchases of low-income households," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 938-952.
    16. Buchs, Milena & Schnepf, Sylke V., 2013. "UK Households' Carbon Footprint: A Comparison of the Association between Household Characteristics and Emissions from Home Energy, Transport and Other Goods and Services," IZA Discussion Papers 7204, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Abdulbaki Bilgic & Steven T. Yen, 2014. "Demand for meat and dairy products by Turkish households: a Bayesian censored system approach," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(2), pages 117-127, March.
    18. Kehlbacher, Ariane & Arnoult, Matthieu & Srinivasan, Chittur & McCloy, Rachel & Tiffin, Richard, 2015. "Food preference segmentation using an AIDS mixture: An application to the UK," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205461, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    19. Widenhorn, Andreas & Salhofer, Klaus, 2014. "Using a Generalized Differenced Demand Model to Estimate Price and Expenditure Elasticities for Milk and Meat in Austria," Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, vol. 63(2).
    20. Caillavet, France & Fadhuile, Adelaide & Nichèle, Véronique, 2014. "Taxing animal foods for sustainability: environmental, nutritional and social perspectives in France," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182863, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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