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The implementation mechanisms of voluntary food safety systems

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  • Fares, M'hand
  • Rouviere, Elodie

Abstract

The recent food scares have been the motivation for voluntary programmes on food safety being promoted by public authorities and voluntarily implemented by food operators. In this article, we take into account the nature of the contamination risk to investigate the complementarities between private and public mechanisms for those voluntary systems to be implemented by a firm. We show two main results. First, when the firm directly markets its products to consumers a strong mandatory threat is a sufficient condition to implement voluntary systems whatever the risk of contamination. In contrast, when the mandatory threat is weak voluntary systems should be more implemented in industries where the risk of food contamination is low (pesticide residue) than in industries where the risk of contamination is high (pathogenic contamination). Second, when the risk of food contamination is low and the firm is embedded in a supply chain where the retailer can impose its own safety system, a well-designed penalty contract will induce a voluntary implementation whatever the mandatory threat.

Suggested Citation

  • Fares, M'hand & Rouviere, Elodie, 2010. "The implementation mechanisms of voluntary food safety systems," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 412-418, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:35:y:2010:i:5:p:412-418
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    Cited by:

    1. Lichtenberg, Erik & Tselepidakis, Elina, 2014. "Prevalence and Cost of On-Farm Produce Safety Measures in the Mid-Atlantic," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 168210, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Bailey, Alison P. & Garforth, Chris, 2014. "An industry viewpoint on the role of farm assurance in delivering food safety to the consumer: The case of the dairy sector of England and Wales," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 14-24.
    3. Danielle Galliano & Luis Orozco, 2013. "New Technologies and Firm Organization: The Case of Electronic Traceability Systems in French Agribusiness," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 22-47, January.
    4. Moser, Christine & Hoffmann, Vivian, 2015. "Firm heterogeneity in food safety provision: Evidence from aflatoxin tests in Kenya:," IFPRI discussion papers 1416, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:74:y:2018:i:c:p:23-38 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Moser, Christine & Hoffmann, Vivian & Ordonez, Romina, 2014. "Firm heterogeneity in food safety provision: evidence from aflatoxin tests in Kenya," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170588, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Adalja, Aaron & Lichtenberg, Erik, 2015. "Impacts of the Food Safety Modernization Act on On-Farm Food Safety Practices for Small and Sustainable Produce Growers," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205322, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    8. Jan Mei Soon & Richard N. Baines, 2013. "Public and Private Food Safety Standards: Facilitating or Frustrating Fresh Produce Growers?," Laws, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(1), pages 1-19, January.
    9. Martino, Gaetano & BavorovĂ , Miroslava, 2014. "An Analysis of Food Safety Private Investments Drivers in the Italian Meat Sector," 2014 International European Forum, February 17-21, 2014, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 199366, International European Forum on Innovation and System Dynamics in Food Networks.
    10. Eric Giraud-HĂ©raud & Cristina Grazia & Abdelhakim Hammoudi, 2012. "Explaining the Emergence of Private Standards in Food Supply Chains," Working Papers hal-00749345, HAL.
    11. Tong Wang & David A. Hennessy, 2012. "Modeling Interdependent Participation Incentives: Dynamics of a Voluntary Livestock Disease Control Program," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 12-wp527, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.

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