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Child mortality risk and fertility: Evidence from prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV

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  • Wilson, Nicholas

Abstract

A fundamental question in development and growth is whether and how fast fertility responds to reductions in child mortality risk. I use the expansion of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) in Zambia to provide some of the first quasi-experimental evidence on this question. My results suggest that the local introduction of PMTCT reduced pregnancy rates by approximately 10%, particularly among likely HIV positive women and women in locations where PMTCT was available for a longer duration, and that PMTCT substantially increased breastfeeding rates.

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  • Wilson, Nicholas, 2015. "Child mortality risk and fertility: Evidence from prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 74-88.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:116:y:2015:i:c:p:74-88
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2015.01.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. McCord, Gordon C. & Conley, Dalton & Sachs, Jeffrey D., 2017. "Malaria ecology, child mortality & fertility," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 1-17.
    2. Joshua Wilde & Bénédicte H. Apouey & Gabriel Picone & Joseph Coleman, 2017. "The Effect of Antimalarial Campaigns on Child Mortality and Fertility in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 0616, University of South Florida, Department of Economics.
    3. Mveyange Anthony, 2015. "On the fertility transition in Africa: Income, child mortality, or education?," WIDER Working Paper Series 089, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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