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Whose education affects a child’s nutritional status? From parents' to household's education

Author

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  • Francesco Burchi

    (Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE))

Abstract

The paper provides two contributions to the ongoing debate on the determinants of child nutrition in developing countries. First, based on data from Mozambique, it provides evidence of the externalities generated by the literacy of household members different from the child’s parents. Second, by means of seemingly unrelated regression together with formal testing, it shows that there is no statistically significant difference in the (positive) effect of parents’ education on two different indicators of child nutrition: height-for-age and weight-for-age. The presence of another literate member of the household, instead, affects only the children’s height. As a conclusion, the paper reinforces the evidence of the robust relationship between household’s education and child anthropometry, and highlights the need to include variables reflecting non-parents literacy/education, whose role is often neglected.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Burchi, 2012. "Whose education affects a child’s nutritional status? From parents' to household's education," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(23), pages 681-704, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:27:y:2012:i:23
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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol27/23/27-23.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Patricia Medrano & Catherine Rodríguez & Edgar Villa, 2008. "Does Mother'S Education Matter In Child'S Health? Evidence From South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 76(4), pages 612-627, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Emily Smith-Greenaway, 2015. "Educational attainment and adult literacy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(35), pages 1015-1034, November.
    2. Headey, Derek & Hoddinott, John & Ali, Disha & Tesfaye, Roman & Dereje, Mekdim, 2015. "The Other Asian Enigma: Explaining the Rapid Reduction of Undernutrition in Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 749-761.
    3. Elisabetta Aurino & Francesco Burchi, 2014. "Children’s Multidimensional Health and Medium-Run Cognitive Skills in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (Documento de Trabajo 129 – Salud multidimensional de los niños y sus habilidades cognitivas en e," Documentos de Trabajo (Niños del Milenio-GRADE) ninosm129, Niños del Milenio (Young Lives).
    4. José Cardoso & Lindsey Allwright & Vincenzo Salvucci, 2016. "Characteristics and determinants of child malnutrition in Mozambique, 2003–11," WIDER Working Paper Series 147, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. repec:pal:eurjdr:v:29:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1057_ejdr.2016.7 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Smith-Greenaway, Emily, 2015. "Are literacy skills associated with young adults' health in Africa? Evidence from Malawi," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 124-133.
    7. Headey, Derek D., 2014. "An analysis of trends and determinants of child undernutrition in Ethiopia, 2000‐2011:," ESSP working papers 70, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Headey, Derek D. & Hoddinott, John F., 2014. "Understanding the rapid reduction of undernutrition in Nepal, 2001-2011:," IFPRI discussion papers 1384, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; anthropometric indicators; child nutrition; education; externalities; regression; seemingly unrelated regression;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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