IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/socmed/v60y2005i2p395-407.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Maternal education and child nutritional status in Bolivia: finding the links

Author

Listed:
  • Frost, Michelle Bellessa
  • Forste, Renata
  • Haas, David W.

Abstract

This study models various pathways linking maternal education and child nutritional status in Bolivia, using a national sample of children. Pathways examined include socioeconomic status, health knowledge, modern attitudes towards health care, female autonomy, and reproductive behavior. The data come from the 1998 Bolivia Demographic and Health Survey. Logistic regression results suggest that socioeconomic factors are the most important pathways linking maternal education and child nutritional status, and that modern attitudes about health care also explain the impact of education. Health care knowledge accounts for less of the effect of maternal education on child nutritional status, with autonomy being the weakest pathway. Other pathways, such as reproductive behaviors, appear to influence nutritional status independent of maternal education. Overall, the pathways examined accounted for 60 percent of the effect of maternal education on child nutritional status.

Suggested Citation

  • Frost, Michelle Bellessa & Forste, Renata & Haas, David W., 2005. "Maternal education and child nutritional status in Bolivia: finding the links," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 395-407, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:60:y:2005:i:2:p:395-407
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277-9536(04)00244-8
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anne Pebley & Paul Stupp, 1987. "Reproductive patterns and child mortality in guatemala," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 24(1), pages 43-60, February.
    2. Sonalde Desai & Soumya Alva, 1998. "Maternal education and child health: Is there a strong causal relationship?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 35(1), pages 71-81, February.
    3. T.S. Saraswathi, 1992. "Child Survival and Health and their Linkages with Psycho-social Factors in the Home and Community1," Psychology and Developing Societies, , vol. 4(1), pages 73-87, September.
    4. Anne Pebley & Noreen Goldman & Germán Rodríguez, 1996. "Prenatal and delivery care and childhood immunization in guatemala: Do family and community matter?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(2), pages 231-247, May.
    5. Cleland, John G. & van Ginneken, Jerome K., 1988. "Maternal education and child survival in developing countries: The search for pathways of influence," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 27(12), pages 1357-1368, January.
    6. Jejeebhoy, Shireen J., 1995. "Women's Education, Autonomy, and Reproductive Behaviour: Experience from Developing Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198290339.
    7. Frank Young & Barry Edmonston & Nancy Andes, 1983. "Community-level determinants of infant and child mortality in peru," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 65-81, January.
    8. Defo, Barthélémy Kuate, 1997. "Effects of socioeconomic disadvantage and women's status on women's health in Cameroon," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 44(7), pages 1023-1042, April.
    9. Paul Glewwe, 1999. "Why Does Mother's Schooling Raise Child Health in Developing Countries? Evidence from Morocco," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 124-159.
    10. Kim Streatfield & Masri Singarimbun & Ian Diamond, 1990. "Maternal Education and Child Immunization," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 27(3), pages 447-455, August.
    11. Barrett, Hazel & Browne, Angela, 1996. "Health, hygiene and maternal education: Evidence from The Gambia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 43(11), pages 1579-1590, December.
    12. Paul Frenzen & Dennis Hogan, 1982. "The impact of class, education, and health care on infant mortality in a developing society: The case of rural Thailand," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 19(3), pages 391-408, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Adnan Fakir & M Khan, 2015. "Determinants of malnutrition among urban slum children in Bangladesh," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 1-11, December.
    2. Dixon, Jenna & Luginaah, Isaac & Mkandawire, Paul, 2014. "The National Health Insurance Scheme in Ghana's Upper West Region: A gendered perspective of insurance acquisition in a resource-poor setting," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 103-112.
    3. Samuel Kobina Annim & Katsushi S. Imai, 2014. "Nutritional Status of Children, Food Consumption Diversity and Ethnicity in Lao PDR," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1404, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    4. Marshall Makate, 2016. "Education Policy and Under-Five Survival in Uganda: Evidence from the Demographic and Health Surveys," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(4), pages 1-17, October.
    5. Francesco Burchi, 2012. "Whose education affects a child’s nutritional status? From parents' to household's education," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(23), pages 681-704, November.
    6. Makate, Marshall & Makate, Clifton, 2016. "The causal effect of increased primary schooling on child mortality in Malawi: Universal primary education as a natural experiment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 72-83.
    7. repec:eee:socmed:v:183:y:2017:i:c:p:56-61 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Miller, Elizabeth M., 2011. "Maternal health and knowledge and infant health outcomes in the Ariaal people of northern Kenya," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(8), pages 1266-1274.
    9. Mustafa Özer & Jan Fidrmuc & Mehmet Ali Eryurt, 2017. "Does Maternal Education Affect Childhood Immunization Rates? Evidence from Turkey," CESifo Working Paper Series 6439, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Yusuf, Shahid & Nabeshima, Kaoru & Wei Ha, 2007. "What makes cities healthy ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4107, The World Bank.
    11. Vikram, Kriti & Vanneman, Reeve & Desai, Sonalde, 2012. "Linkages between maternal education and childhood immunization in India," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 331-339.
    12. Arulampalam, Wiji & Bhaskar, Anjor & Srivastava, Nisha, 2016. "Does Greater Autonomy among Women Provide the Key to Better Child Nutrition?," IZA Discussion Papers 9781, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Mandal, Biswajit & Bhattacharjee, Prasun & Banerjee, Souvik, 2016. "A Simple Model on Mothers’ Autonomy, Health Inputs, and Child Health," MPRA Paper 76360, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Hayley Pierce & Ashley Larsen Gibby & Renata Forste, 2016. "Caregiver Decision-Making: Household Response to Child Illness in Sub-Saharan Africa," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(5), pages 581-597, October.
    15. Adnan M. S. Fakir, 2016. "Revisiting the child health-wealth nexus," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 1-13, December.
    16. De Neve, Jan-Walter & Harling, Guy, 2017. "Offspring schooling associated with increased parental survival in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 149-157.
    17. Maria Carmela Lo Bue, 2014. "What drives child health improvements in Indonesian households? A micro-level perspective on complementarities in MDG achievements," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 155, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    18. Øystein Kravdal & Ivy Kodzi, 2011. "Children's stunting in sub-Saharan Africa: Is there an externality effect of high fertility?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(18), pages 565-594, September.
    19. Shroff, Monal R. & Griffiths, Paula L. & Suchindran, Chirayath & Nagalla, Balakrishna & Vazir, Shahnaz & Bentley, Margaret E., 2011. "Does maternal autonomy influence feeding practices and infant growth in rural India?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(3), pages 447-455, August.
    20. Quamruzzaman, Amm & Mendoza Rodríguez, José M. & Heymann, Jody & Kaufman, Jay S. & Nandi, Arijit, 2014. "Are tuition-free primary education policies associated with lower infant and neonatal mortality in low- and middle-income countries?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 153-159.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:60:y:2005:i:2:p:395-407. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.