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Prenatal and delivery care and childhood immunization in guatemala: Do family and community matter?

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  • Anne Pebley
  • Noreen Goldman
  • Germán Rodríguez

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Anne Pebley & Noreen Goldman & Germán Rodríguez, 1996. "Prenatal and delivery care and childhood immunization in guatemala: Do family and community matter?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(2), pages 231-247, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:33:y:1996:i:2:p:231-247
    DOI: 10.2307/2061874
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mark Montgomery & Paul Hewett, 2005. "Urban poverty and health in developing countries: Household and neighborhood Effects," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(3), pages 397-425, August.
    2. Vikram, Kriti & Vanneman, Reeve & Desai, Sonalde, 2012. "Linkages between maternal education and childhood immunization in India," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 331-339.
    3. Regina Fuchs & Elsie Pamuk & Wolfgang Lutz, 2010. "Education or wealth: which matters more for reducing child mortality in developing countries?," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 8(1), pages 175-199.
    4. Sepehri, Ardeshir & Sarma, Sisira & Simpson, Wayne & Moshiri, Saeed, 2008. "How important are individual, household and commune characteristics in explaining utilization of maternal health services in Vietnam?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(6), pages 1009-1017, September.
    5. Navaneetham K & Dharmalingam A, 2007. "Utilization Of Maternal Health Care In South India," Working Papers id:940, eSocialSciences.
    6. Gyimah, Stephen Obeng, 2009. "Polygynous marital structure and child survivorship in sub-Saharan Africa: Some empirical evidence from Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 334-342, January.
    7. Kenneth Harttgen & Mark Misselhorn, 2006. "A Multilevel Approach to Explain Child Mortality and Undernutrition in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 152, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    8. Mistry, Ritesh & Galal, Osman & Lu, Michael, 2009. "Women's autonomy and pregnancy care in rural India: A contextual analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(6), pages 926-933, September.
    9. Frost, Michelle Bellessa & Forste, Renata & Haas, David W., 2005. "Maternal education and child nutritional status in Bolivia: finding the links," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 395-407, January.
    10. Choi, Jin Young & Lee, Sang-Hyop, 2006. "Does prenatal care increase access to child immunization? Gender bias among children in India," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 107-117, July.
    11. Gauri, Varun & Khaleghian, Peyvand, 2002. "Immunization in Developing Countries: Its Political and Organizational Determinants," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(12), pages 2109-2132, December.
    12. Guliani, Harminder & Sepehri, Ardeshir & Serieux, John, 2012. "What impact does contact with the prenatal care system have on women’s use of facility delivery? Evidence from low-income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(12), pages 1882-1890.
    13. Lindstrom, David P & Muñoz-Franco, Elisa, 2006. "Migration and maternal health services utilization in rural Guatemala," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 706-721, August.
    14. Gage, Anastasia J., 2007. "Barriers to the utilization of maternal health care in rural Mali," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(8), pages 1666-1682, October.
    15. Yusuke Kamiya, 2010. "Endogenous Women's Autonomy and the Use of Reproductive Health Services: Empirical Evidence from Tajikistan," OSIPP Discussion Paper 10E010, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    16. Sadique, M. Z. & Asadullah, M. N., 2006. "Identifying the effect of public health program on child immunisation in rural Bangladesh," Working Papers 06/06, Department of Economics, City University London.
    17. Jeffrey E. Harris & Sandra G. Sosa-Rubi, 2009. "Impact of "Seguro Popular" on Prenatal Visits in Mexico, 2002-2005: Latent Class Model of Count Data with a Discrete Endogenous Variable," NBER Working Papers 14995, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Eric Y. Tenkorang, 2016. "Type of Health Facility and Utilization of Antenatal Care Services Among Ghanaian Women," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(5), pages 631-650, October.
    19. Stephen Matthews & Daniel M. Parker, 2013. "Progress in Spatial Demography," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(10), pages 271-312, February.

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