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AIDS education, condom demand, and the sexual activity of American youth

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  • Carol Horton Tremblay

    (Department of Economics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, USA)

  • Davina C. Ling

    (Department of Economics, California State University, Fullerton, USA)

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of AIDS education at school and at home on the sexual behavior of American youth. Multinomial logit equations of the probabilities of abstinence, sexual intercourse with a condom, and intercourse without a condom are estimated using data from the Youth Risk Behavior Supplement of the 1992 National Health Interview Survey. We find no significant effects of AIDS education on the probability of abstinence, but we do find that AIDS education significantly raises the likelihood of condom-protected relative to unprotected intercourse. These results indicate that risk-altering and risk-revealing AIDS education dominate any utility-altering effects favoring intercourse over abstinence. We also find that young women are influenced by AIDS education to a greater extent than young men. Overall, our results suggest that educating young people about AIDS does not promote sex and encourages safer sex, reducing the likelihood of HIV transmission and lowering the subsequent social costs. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Carol Horton Tremblay & Davina C. Ling, 2005. "AIDS education, condom demand, and the sexual activity of American youth," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(8), pages 851-867.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:14:y:2005:i:8:p:851-867
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.989
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Avner Ahituv & V. Joseph Hotz & Tomas Philipson, 1996. "The Responsiveness of the Demand for Condoms to the Local Prevalence of AIDS," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(4), pages 869-897.
    2. Gerald S. Oettinger, 1999. "The Effects of Sex Education on Teen Sexual Activity and Teen Pregnancy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 606-635, June.
    3. Philipson, Tomas & Posner, Richard A, 1994. "Public Spending on AIDS Education: An Economic Analysis," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(1), pages 17-38, April.
    4. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1986. "Evaluating the Effects of Optimally Distributed Public Programs: ChildHealth and Family Planning Interventions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(3), pages 470-482, June.
    5. Olsen, Randall J & Farkas, George, 1990. "The Effect of Economic Opportunity and Family Background on Adolescent Cohabitation and Childbearing among Low-Income Blacks," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(3), pages 341-362, July.
    6. Evans, William N & Oates, Wallace E & Schwab, Robert M, 1992. "Measuring Peer Group Effects: A Study of Teenage Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(5), pages 966-991, October.
    7. Pagan, Adrian & Vella, Frank, 1989. "Diagnostic Tests for Models Based on Individual Data: A Survey," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 4(S), pages 29-59, Supplemen.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anderson, D. Mark & Hansen, Benjamin & Walker, Mary Beth, 2013. "The minimum dropout age and student victimization," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 66-74.
    2. D. Mark Anderson, 2013. "The Impact Of Hiv Education On Behavior Among Youths: A Propensity Score Matching Approach," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(3), pages 503-527, July.
    3. Pamela Ortiz Arévalo, 2009. "Does sex education influence sexual and reproductive behaviour of women? Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers. Serie AD 2009-01, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    4. Mario Andres Fernandez & Douglas Shaw, 2013. "Willingness to pay for intervention policies related to HIV/AIDS: a theoretical framework with endogenous risk, perceived effectiveness and altruism," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1457-1467.

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