IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/labour/v29y2015i4p348-366.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

New Firms as Employers: The Wage Penalty for Voluntary and Involuntary Job Switchers

Author

Listed:
  • Kristina Nyström
  • Gulzat Zhetibaeva Elvung

Abstract

According to previous research, new firms pay lower wages. However, previous studies have been unable to control for the possibility that the opportunity costs of accepting employment at new firms may differ across individuals. In this paper, we investigate whether a wage penalty for being employed at a new firm exists if we take the individual employee's experience and status in the labour market into consideration. We focus on individuals who decide to switch jobs and use matched employee–employer data about all firms and employees in Sweden for the period 1998–2010. Our results show that the share of job transitions into lower wages are higher for those who switch to new firms compared with incumbent firms (40 per cent and 31 per cent, respectively). Our endogenous wage equation estimates indicate that being an involuntary job switcher has an equally negative effect on wages at both new and incumbent firms. However, the positive effect of education on wages is more pronounced for job switchers selecting into incumbent firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Kristina Nyström & Gulzat Zhetibaeva Elvung, 2015. "New Firms as Employers: The Wage Penalty for Voluntary and Involuntary Job Switchers," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(4), pages 348-366, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:29:y:2015:i:4:p:348-366
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/labr.12055
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2001. "Firm Size, Earnings, and Displacement Risk," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 39(3), pages 474-486, July.
    2. Kristina Nyström & Gulzat Elvung, 2014. "New firms and labor market entrants: Is there a wage penalty for employment in new firms?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 399-410, August.
    3. Brown, Sarah & Roberts, Jennifer & Taylor, Karl, 2011. "The gender reservation wage gap: Evidence from British Panel data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 113(1), pages 88-91, October.
    4. van der Gaag, Jacques & Vijverberg, Wim, 1988. "A Switching Regression Model for Wage Determinants in the Public and Private Sectors of a Developing Country," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(2), pages 244-252, May.
    5. Morton Stelcner & Jacques van der Gaag & Wim Vijverberg, 1989. "A Switching Regression Model of Public-Private Sector Wage Differentials in Peru: 1985-86," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(3), pages 545-559.
    6. Fabien Postel-Vinay & Jean-Marc Robin, 2002. "Equilibrium Wage Dispersion with Worker and Employer Heterogeneity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(6), pages 2295-2350, November.
    7. Frederiksen, Anders & Westergaard-Nielsen, Niels, 2007. "Where did they go? Modelling transitions out of jobs," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 811-828, October.
    8. repec:ags:stataj:116249 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Jolivet, Gregory & Postel-Vinay, Fabien & Robin, Jean-Marc, 2006. "The empirical content of the job search model: Labor mobility and wage distributions in Europe and the US," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 877-907, May.
    10. Nooney, Jennifer G. & Unruh, Lynn & Yore, Michelle M., 2010. "Should I stay or should I go? Career change and labor force separation among registered nurses in the U.S," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(12), pages 1874-1881, June.
    11. Eriksson, Tor & Moritz Kuhn, Johan, 2006. "Firm spin-offs in Denmark 1981-2000 -- patterns of entry and exit," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 1021-1040, September.
    12. Pierre Cahuc & André Zylberberg, 2004. "Labor Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026203316x, January.
    13. Clark, Andrew E., 2001. "What really matters in a job? Hedonic measurement using quit data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 223-242, May.
    14. Martin Andersson & Steven Klepper, 2013. "Characteristics and performance of new firms and spinoffs in Sweden," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 245-280, February.
    15. Ed Nosal & Peter Rupert, 2007. "How Amenities Affect Job and Wage Choices Over the Life Cycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(3), pages 424-443, July.
    16. Madhu Mohanty, 2005. "An alternative method of estimating the worker's reservation wage," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(4), pages 501-522.
    17. Dustmann, Christian & van Soest, Arthur, 1998. "Public and private sector wages of male workers in Germany," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(8), pages 1417-1441, September.
    18. Garcia Perez, Jose Ignacio & Rebollo Sanz, Yolanda, 2005. "Wage changes through job mobility in Europe: A multinomial endogenous switching approach," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 531-555, August.
    19. Charles Brown & James L. Medoff, 2003. "Firm Age and Wages," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(3), pages 677-698, July.
    20. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Duranton, Gilles & Gobillon, Laurent, 2008. "Spatial wage disparities: Sorting matters!," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 723-742, March.
    21. Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 1995. "Does layoff risk explain the firm-size wage differential?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(7), pages 211-214.
    22. Fredrik Heyman, 2007. "Firm Size or Firm Age? The Effect on Wages Using Matched Employer-Employee Data," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(2), pages 237-263, June.
    23. Sullivan, Paul, 2010. "Empirical evidence on occupation and industry specific human capital," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 567-580, June.
    24. Feldstein, Martin & Poterba, James, 1984. "Unemployment insurance and reservation wages," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1-2), pages 141-167.
    25. Udo Brixy & Susanne Kohaut & Claus Schnabel, 2007. "Do Newly Founded Firms Pay Lower Wages? First Evidence from Germany," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 161-171, June.
    26. Addison, John T & Portugal, Pedro, 1989. "Job Displacement, Relative Wage Changes, and Duration of Unemployment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(3), pages 281-302, July.
    27. Boman, Anders, 2012. "Employment effects of extended geographic scope in job search," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 643-652.
    28. Kathleen Arano & Carl Parker & Rory Terry, 2010. "Gender-Based Risk Aversion And Retirement Asset Allocation," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(1), pages 147-155, January.
    29. Bachmann, Ronald & Bauer, Thomas K. & David, Peggy, 2010. "Labor Market Entry Conditions, Wages and Job Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 4965, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    30. Helena Persson, 2004. "The Survival and Growth of New Establishments in Sweden, 1987-1995," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 23(5), pages 423-440, October.
    31. Paolo Sestito & Eliana Viviano, 2011. "Reservation Wages: Explaining Some Puzzling Regional Patterns," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 25(1), pages 63-88, March.
    32. Scott Shane, 2009. "Why encouraging more people to become entrepreneurs is bad public policy," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 141-149, August.
    33. Chris Sakellariou, 2012. "Central Government versus private sector wages and cognitive skills: evidence using endogenous switching regression," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(25), pages 3275-3286, September.
    34. Charness, Gary & Gneezy, Uri, 2012. "Strong Evidence for Gender Differences in Risk Taking," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 50-58.
    35. Christian Pfeifer & Stefan Schneck, 2012. "Relative Wage Positions and Quit Behavior: Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee Data," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 65(1), pages 126-147, January.
    36. Thomas Behrends, 2007. "Recruitment Practices in Small and Medium Size Enterprises.An Empirical Study among Knowledge-intensive Professional Service Firms," management revue. Socio-economic Studies, Rainer Hampp Verlag, vol. 18(1), pages 55-74.
    37. Leung, Aegean & Zhang, Jing & Wong, Poh Kam & Foo, Maw Der, 2006. "The use of networks in human resource acquisition for entrepreneurial firms: Multiple "fit" considerations," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 664-686, September.
    38. Adamchik, Vera A. & Bedi, Arjun S., 2000. "Wage differentials between the public and the private sectors: evidence from an economy in transition," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 203-224, March.
    39. Kristin Kronenberg & Martin Carree, 2012. "On the Move: Determinants of Job and Residential Mobility in Different Sectors," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 49(16), pages 3679-3698, December.
    40. Gianna Barbieri & Paolo Sestito, 2008. "Temporary Workers in Italy: Who Are They and Where They End Up," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(1), pages 127-166, March.
    41. Lokshin, Michael & Sajaia, Zurab, 2004. "Maximum likelihood estimation of endogenous switching regression models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(3), pages 1-8.
    42. Oosterbeek, Hessel & van Praag, Mirjam, 1995. "Firm-Size Wage Differentials in the Netherlands," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 173-182, June.
    43. Geroski, P. A., 1995. "What do we know about entry?," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 421-440, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Fackler, Daniel & Fuchs, Michaela & Hölscher, Lisa & Schnabel, Claus, 2018. "Do Startups Provide Employment Opportunities for Disadvantaged Workers?," IZA Discussion Papers 11556, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Dorner, Matthias & Fryges, Helmut & Schopen, Kathrin, 2017. "Wages in high-tech start-ups – Do academic spin-offs pay a wage premium?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 1-18.
    3. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:3:p:637-649 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Brixy, Udo & Brunow, Stephan & D''Ambrosio, Anna, 2017. "Ethnic diversity in start-ups and its impact on innovation," IAB Discussion Paper 201725, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    5. repec:iab:iabdpa:201817 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:29:y:2015:i:4:p:348-366. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/csrotit.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.