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How Amenities Affect Job and Wage Choices Over the Life Cycle

Author

Listed:
  • Ed Nosal

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland)

  • Peter Rupert

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland)

Abstract

Job amenities are explicitly included in a model of job choice over the life cycle. The amenities are characterized by an indivisibility--a worker must be present at a job to enjoy its amenities. This chacterization has implications on initial job choice, a worker's wage profile and whether they move to a higher or lower paying job. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Ed Nosal & Peter Rupert, 2007. "How Amenities Affect Job and Wage Choices Over the Life Cycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(3), pages 424-443, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:05-64
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2006.12.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Matthew S. Dey & Christopher J. Flinn, 2005. "An Equilibrium Model of Health Insurance Provision and Wage Determination," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 571-627, March.
    2. Hwang, Hae-shin & Mortensen, Dale T & Reed, W Robert, 1998. "Hedonic Wages and Labor Market Search," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(4), pages 815-847, October.
    3. Altonji, Joseph G & Paxson, Christina H, 1988. "Labor Supply Preferences, Hours Constraints, and Hours-Wage Trade-Offs," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(2), pages 254-276, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christine Braun & Charlie Nusbaum & Peter Rupert, 2017. "Dual Job Search and Migration," 2017 Meeting Papers 789, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Krusell, Per & Mukoyama, Toshihiko & Rogerson, Richard & Sahin, Aysegül, 2008. "Aggregate implications of indivisible labor, incomplete markets, and labor market frictions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(5), pages 961-979, July.
    3. Kristina Nyström & Gulzat Zhetibaeva Elvung, 2015. "New Firms as Employers: The Wage Penalty for Voluntary and Involuntary Job Switchers," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(4), pages 348-366, December.
    4. Lars Ljungqvist & Thomas J. Sargent, 2007. "Do Taxes Explain European Employment? Indivisible Labor, Human Capital, Lotteries, and Savings," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2006, Volume 21, pages 181-246 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job changes; Amenities; Lifetime wage profile;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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