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Flexible Wage Contracts, Temporary Jobs, and Firm Performance: Evidence From Italian Firms

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  • Michele Battisti
  • Giovanna Vallanti

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  • Michele Battisti & Giovanna Vallanti, 2013. "Flexible Wage Contracts, Temporary Jobs, and Firm Performance: Evidence From Italian Firms," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 737-764, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:indres:v:52:y:2013:i:3:p:737-764
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/irel.12031
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    Cited by:

    1. Valeria Cirillo & Marta Fana & Dario Guarascio, 2017. "Labour market reforms in Italy: evaluating the effects of the Jobs Act," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 34(2), pages 211-232, August.
    2. Fernando Martins & Mario Izquierdo & Theodora Kosma & Ana Lamo & Simon Savsek, 2018. "Did recent reforms facilitate EU labour market adjustment? Firm level evidence," Working Papers w201807, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    3. Francesco Devicienti & Paolo Naticchioni & Andrea Ricci, 2018. "Temporary Employment, Demand Volatility, and Unions: Firm-Level Evidence," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 71(1), pages 174-207, January.
    4. Savšek, Simon, 2018. "What are the main obstacles to hiring after recessions in Europe?," Working Paper Series 2153, European Central Bank.
    5. Bosco, Maria Giovanna & Valeriani, Elisa, 2018. "Labour contracts and stepping-stone effect in Italy: A multinomial analysis," Economics Discussion Papers 2018-13, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    6. George, Elizabeth. & Chattopadhyay, Prithviraj., 2015. "Non-standard work and workers : organizational implications," ILO Working Papers 994883083402676, International Labour Organization.
    7. Francesco Devicienti & Paolo Naticchioni & Andrea Ricci, 2015. "How Do Demand Volatility And Unions Affect Temporary Employment? A Firm-Level Approach," Working Papers 0415, CREI Università degli Studi Roma Tre, revised 2015.
    8. repec:spr:italej:v:4:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s40797-018-0077-3 is not listed on IDEAS

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