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Employer Search, Training, and Vacancy Duration

Citations

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Cited by:

  1. Bhuller, Manudeep & Kostøl, Andreas & Vigtel, Trond Christian, 2019. "How Broadband Internet Affects Labor Market Matching," Memorandum 10/2019, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  2. Peter J. Kuhn & Lizi Yu, 2019. "How Costly is Turnover? Evidence from Retail," NBER Working Papers 26179, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Pascal Michaillat, 2012. "Do Matching Frictions Explain Unemployment? Not in Bad Times," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(4), pages 1721-1750, June.
  4. Langot, François & Pizzo, Alessandra, 2019. "Accounting for labor gaps," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 312-347.
  5. Landais, Camille & Michaillat, Pascal & Saez, Emmanuel, 2010. "Optimal Unemployment Insurance over the Business Cycle," CEPR Discussion Papers 8132, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Craig Gundersen & Brent Kreider, 2008. "Food Stamps and Food Insecurity: What Can Be Learned in the Presence of Nonclassical Measurement Error?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(2), pages 352-382.
  7. Kreider, Brent & Pepper, John V., 2011. "Identification of Expected Outcomes in a Data Error Mixing Model With Multiplicative Mean Independence," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 29(1), pages 49-60.
  8. Riccardo Welters & Joan Muysken, 2006. "Employer search and employment subsidies," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(12), pages 1435-1448.
  9. Francesco Zanetti & Konstantinos Theodoridis, 2018. "State Dependence in Labor Market Fluctuations: Evidence, Theory, and Policy Implications," Economics Series Working Papers 856, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  10. Michele Pellizzari, 2010. "Do Friends and Relatives Really Help in Getting a Good Job?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 63(3), pages 494-510, April.
  11. Hairault, Jean-Olivier & Langot, Francois & Sopraseuth, Thepthida, 2019. "Unemployment fluctuations over the life cycle," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 334-352.
  12. Camille Landais & Pascal Michaillat & Emmanuel Saez, 2010. "A Macroeconomic Theory of Optimal Unemployment Insurance," NBER Working Papers 16526, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Delacroix, Alain, 2004. "Sticky bargained wages," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 25-44, March.
  14. Brändle, Tobias & Grunau, Philipp & Haylock, Michael & Kampkötter, Patrick, 2020. "Recruitment strategies and match quality - New evidence from representative linked employer-employee data," University of Tübingen Working Papers in Business and Economics 134, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, School of Business and Economics.
  15. Bemjamin Villena-Roldan, 2009. "Aggregate Implications of Employer Search and Recruiting Selection," 2009 Meeting Papers 97, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  16. Pollak, Andreas, 2013. "Employment Insurance and the Business Cycle," MPRA Paper 49358, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  17. Claire A. Reicher, 2016. "Matching labor’s share in a search and matching model," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 1229-1254, June.
  18. Oyer, Paul & Schaefer, Scott, 2011. "Personnel Economics: Hiring and Incentives," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.),Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 20, pages 1769-1823, Elsevier.
  19. Lars Behrenz, 2001. "Who Gets The Job And Why? An Explorative Study Of Employersâ’ Recruitment Behavior," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 4, pages 255-278, November.
  20. Brencic, Vera & Norris, John B., 2010. "Do employers change job offers in their online job ads to facilitate search?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 46-48, July.
  21. Steven J. Davis & R. Jason Faberman & John C. Haltiwanger, 2013. "The Establishment-Level Behavior of Vacancies and Hiring," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(2), pages 581-622.
  22. Jean-Olivier Hairault & François Langot & Thepthida Sopraseuth, 2014. "Why is Old Workers’ Labor Market more Volatile? Unemployment Fluctuations over the Life-Cycle," TEPP Working Paper 2014-03, TEPP.
  23. Russo, Giovanni & Gorter, Cees & Schettkat, Ronald, 2001. "Searching, hiring and labour market conditions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(5), pages 553-571, December.
  24. Alain Delacroix, 2003. "Transitions into Unemployment and the Nature of Firing Costs," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 6(3), pages 651-671, July.
  25. Holzer, Harry & Neumark, David, 1999. "Are Affirmative Action Hires Less Qualified? Evidence from Employer-Employee Data on New Hires," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(3), pages 534-569, July.
  26. Nicolas Petrosky-Nadeau, 2014. "Credit, Vacancies and Unemployment Fluctuations," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(2), pages 191-205, April.
  27. Hassink, Wolter & Russo, Giovanni, 2010. "The Glass Door: The Gender Composition of Newly-Hired Workers Across Hierarchical Job Levels," IZA Discussion Papers 4858, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  28. Faberman, R. Jason & Menzio, Guido, 2018. "Evidence on the relationship between recruiting and the starting wage," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 67-79.
  29. Welters, Riccardo & Muysken, Joan, 2008. "Inferring Employer Search Behaviour from Wage Subsidy Participation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 844-858, October.
  30. Michaillat, Pascal, 2011. "Fiscal Multipliers Over the Business Cycle," CEPR Discussion Papers 8610, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  31. Julien Albertini & Jean Olivier Hairault & Francois Langot & Thepthida Sopraseuth, 2016. "Aggregate Employment, Job Polarization and Inequalities: A Transatlantic Perspective," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2016-014, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  32. Brencic, Vera, 2007. "Employers' search prior to exhaustion of advance notice period," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 266-270, February.
  33. Takuya Hasebe, 2011. "The Type of Contract and Starting Wage and Wage Growth: The Evidence from New Graduates from Post-Secondary Schools in the Netherlands," Working Papers 20, AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium.
  34. Sengul, Gonul, 2017. "Effect of labor market policies on unemployment when firms adapt their recruitment strategy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 169-179.
  35. Garey Ramey, 2008. "Exogenous vs. Endogenous Separation," 2008 Meeting Papers 466, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  36. Silva, José Ignacio & Toledo, Manuel, 2009. "Labor Turnover Costs And The Cyclical Behavior Of Vacancies And Unemployment," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(S1), pages 76-96, May.
  37. Henna Nivalainen, 2014. "Internet-Based Employer Search and Vacancy Duration: Evidence from Finland," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(1), pages 112-140, March.
  38. Eriksson, Stefan, 2002. "Imperfect information, wage formation, and the employability of the unemployed," Working Paper Series 2002:17, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  39. Manant, Matthieu & Pajak, Serge & Soulié, Nicolas, 2014. "Do recruiters 'like' it? Online social networks and privacy in hiring: a pseudo-randomized experiment," MPRA Paper 56845, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  40. R. Jason Faberman, 2020. "Recruiting intensity," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-21, July.
  41. Jenkins, Andrew & Wolf, Alison, 2002. "Why do employers use selection tests? Evidence from British workplaces," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19503, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  42. M. J. Andrews & S. Bradley & D. Stott & R. Upward, 2008. "Successful Employer Search? An Empirical Analysis of Vacancy Duration Using Micro Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(299), pages 455-480, August.
  43. Andrew Jenkins & Alison Wolf, 2002. "Why Do Employers Use Selection Tests? Evidence from British Workplaces," CEE Discussion Papers 0027, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  44. Vera Brenčič, 2010. "Do Employers Respond to the Costs of Continued Search?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(2), pages 221-245, April.
  45. Harbo hansen, Niels-Jakob, 2019. "Measuring job openings: evidence from Swedish plant level data," Working Paper Series 2019:27, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  46. Brencic, Vera, 2009. "Employers' hiring practices, employment protection, and costly search: A vacancy-level analysis," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 461-479, October.
  47. H. J. Holzer, "undated". "Why do small establishments hire fewer blacks than large ones," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1119-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  48. Ryan Chahrour & Sanjay Chugh & Tristan Potter, 2020. "Anticipated Productivity and the Labor Market," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 992, Boston College Department of Economics.
  49. Albertini, Julien & Hairault, Jean-Olivier & Langot, François & Sopraseuth, Thepthida, 2017. "A Tale of Two Countries: A Story of the French and US Polarization," IZA Discussion Papers 11013, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  50. Sengul, Gonul, 2017. "Learning about match quality: Information flows and labor market outcomes," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 118-130.
  51. H. J. Holzer, "undated". "Employer skill needs and labor market outcome by race and gender," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1087-96, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
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