IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Cyclical Upgrading of Labor and Employment Differences across Skill Groups


  • Andri Chassamboulli


This paper examines the cyclical properties of employment rates in a search and matching model that features heterogeneous workers and jobs. Firms can create vacancies for jobs that that require either a high- or a low-skill level. High-skill workers are best suited for high-skill jobs, but are also qualified for low-skill jobs, whereas low-skill workers are only qualified for low-skill jobs. My analysis highlights the importance of a vertical type of transitory skill-mismatch, which takes the form workers accepting jobs below their skill level to escape unemployment and upgrading by on-the-job search, in explaining why typically employment is lower and more procyclical at lower skill levels. I show that this feature makes low-skill vacancy creation more strongly procyclical than high-skill vacancy creation. The model is also consistent with important features of the labor market, such as a procyclical rate of job-to-job transitions and evidence that the educational levels of new hires within occupations are higher in recessions and lower in booms.

Suggested Citation

  • Andri Chassamboulli, 2010. "Cyclical Upgrading of Labor and Employment Differences across Skill Groups," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 14-2010, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucy:cypeua:14-2010

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Miana Plesca, 2010. "A General Equilibrium Evaluation of the Employment Service," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 274-329.
    2. van Ours, J. C. & Ridder, G., 1995. "Job matching and job competition: Are lower educated workers at the back of job queues?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1717-1731, December.
    3. van Ours, Jan & Ridder, Geert, 1992. "Vacancies and the Recruitment of New Employees," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(2), pages 138-155, April.
    4. Behrman, Jere R. & Rosenzweig, Mark R., 1999. ""Ability" biases in schooling returns and twins: a test and new estimates," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 159-167, April.
    5. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1993. "Labor Demand and the Source of Adjustment Costs," NBER Working Papers 4394, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:1231-1264 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Cuadras-Morató Xavier & Mateos-Planas Xavier, 2013. "Overeducation and skill-biased technical change," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-18, September.
    3. Brendan Epstein, 2012. "Heterogeneous workers, optimal job seeking, and aggregate labor market dynamics," International Finance Discussion Papers 1053, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Summerfield, Fraser, 2014. "Labor Market Conditions, Skill Requirements and Education Mismatch," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2014-19, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 28 Apr 2014.
    5. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:1370-1387 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Xiangbo Liu & Theodore Palivos & Xiaomeng Zhang, 2017. "Immigration, Skill Heterogeneity, And Qualification Mismatch," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(3), pages 1231-1264, July.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucy:cypeua:14-2010. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.