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Accounting for Labor Gaps

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We develop a balanced growth model with labor supply and search and matching frictions in the labor market to study the impact of economic policy variables on the two margins which constitute the (total) labor input: the extensive one (the rate of employment) and the intensive one (the hours worked per worker). We show that the dynamics of the taxes have an impact mainly on the hours worked while labor market institutions have a large influence on the rate of employment. However, our findings underline that there is an interaction between the two margins. The model is tested on four countries (US, France, Germany and UK) which experiment different tax and labor market dynamics since the sixties. Using this structural approach, we can then perform counterfactual experiments about the evolution of the policy variables and to compare welfare levels implied by policy changes

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  • François Langot & Alessandra Pizzo, 2015. "Accounting for Labor Gaps," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 15036, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:cesdoc:15036
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    Cited by:

    1. Aubert, Diane & Chiroleu-Assouline, Mireille, 2019. "Environmental tax reform and income distribution with imperfect heterogeneous labour markets," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 60-82.
    2. Kandoussi, Malak & Langot, François, 2020. "Uncertainty Shocks and Unemployment Dynamics," IZA Discussion Papers 13438, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Julien Albertini & Xavier Fairise & Arthur Poirier & Anthony Terriau, 2022. "Short-time work policies during the COVID-19 pandemic," TEPP Working Paper 2022-13, TEPP.
    4. Olivier Charlot & Idriss Fontaine & Thepthida Sopraseuth, 2019. "Employment Fluctuations, Job Polarization and Non-Standard Work: Evidence from France and the US," THEMA Working Papers 2019-14, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    5. Julien Albertini & Xavier Fairise & Arthur Poirier & Anthony Terriau, 2022. "Short-Time Work Policies During the Covid-19 Pandemic," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 146, pages 123-172.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Taxes; labor market institutions; hours; employment; labor market search;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

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