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Policy Analysis In A Matching Model With Intensive And Extensive Margins


  • Lei Fang
  • Richard Rogerson


The large differences in hours of work across rich countries reflect large differences in both employment to population ratios and hours per worker. We imbed the canonical model of labor supply into a matching model to produce a model with operative intensive and extensive margins, and assess the implications of several policies for changes along the two margins. Tax and transfer policies lead to decreases along both margins, whereas regulations that increase the cost of creating or maintaining a job may lead to decreases in employment, but necessarily lead to increases in hours per worker. Copyright © (2009) by the Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Lei Fang & Richard Rogerson, 2009. "Policy Analysis In A Matching Model With Intensive And Extensive Margins," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1153-1168, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:50:y:2009:i:4:p:1153-1168

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kudoh, Noritaka & Miyamoto, Hiroaki & Sasaki, Masaru, 2015. "Employment and Hours over the Business Cycle in a Model with Search Frictions," IZA Discussion Papers 8946, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. François Langot & Alessandra Pizzo, 2015. "Accounting for Labor Gaps," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01164076, HAL.
    3. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Sarah Zubairy, 2008. "A primer on the empirical identification of government spending shocks," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 117-132.
    4. Been-Lon Chen & Chih-Fang Lai, 2016. "Relative effects of labor taxes on employment and working hours: role of mechanisms shaping working hours," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 117(1), pages 49-84, January.
    5. Aleksander Berentsen & Guido Menzio & Randall Wright, 2011. "Inflation and Unemployment in the Long Run," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(1), pages 371-398, February.
    6. Chen, Been-Lon & Lai, Chih-Fang, 2015. "Effects of labor taxes and unemployment compensation on labor supply in a search model with an endogenous labor force," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 300-317.
    7. Ohanian, Lee E. & Raffo, Andrea, 2012. "Aggregate hours worked in OECD countries: New measurement and implications for business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 40-56.
    8. Temel Taskin, 2013. "Intensive margin and extensive margin adjustments of labor market: Turkey versus United States," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 2307-2319.
    9. Berentsen, Aleksander & Menzio, Guido & Wright, Randall D., 2007. "Inflation and Unemployment: Lagos-Wright meets Mortensen-Pissarides," Kiel Working Papers 1334, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    10. Jose Emilio Boscá & Rafael Domenech & Javier Ferri, 2008. "Tax Reforms and Labour-market Performance: An Evaluation for Spain using REMS," Working Papers 0804, International Economics Institute, University of Valencia.
    11. repec:adr:anecst:y:2009:i:95-96:p:06 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Chen, Been-Lon & Hsu, Mei & Lai, Chih-Fang, 2016. "Relation between growth and unemployment in a model with labor-force participation and adverse labor institutions," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 273-292.
    13. Gonzalo Llosa & Lee Ohanian & Andrea Raffo & Richard Rogerson, 2014. "Firing Costs and Labor Market Fluctuations: A Cross-Country Analysis," 2014 Meeting Papers 533, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    14. Sevgi Coskun, 2016. "Labor Market Fluctuations in Developing Countries," EcoMod2016 9732, EcoMod.
    15. repec:hal:journl:halshs-01164076 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor


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