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Understanding Differences in Hours Worked

  • Richard Rogerson

    (Arizona State University)

This paper documents the large differences in hours of work across OECD countries and shows how these differences have evolved over time. It argues that changes in technology and government can potentially account for the broad patterns of change. (Copyright: Elsevier)

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.red.2006.05.002
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Article provided by Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics in its journal Review of Economic Dynamics.

Volume (Year): 9 (2006)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 365-409

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Handle: RePEc:red:issued:06-5
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