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Discriminatory Social Attitudes and Varying Gender Pay Gaps within firms

Author

Listed:
  • Simon Janssen

    () (Department of Business Administration (IBW), University of Zurich)

  • Simone N. Tuor Sartore

    () (Department of Business Administration (IBW), University of Zurich)

  • Uschi Backes-Gellner

    () (Department of Business Administration (IBW), University of Zurich)

Abstract

This study analyzes the relationship between discriminatory social attitudes and the variation of within-firm pay gaps by combining data on regional votes on gender equality laws with a data set of multi-establishments firms and their workers. The data set allows us for the first time to study gender pay gaps within the same firm across establishments located in regions with varying discriminatory social attitudes. Our results show that firms have larger pay gaps in regions with stronger discriminatory social attitudes. This result remains robust when we account for detailed worker and job characteristics and prevails for different subsamples. Thus we show that a relationship between discriminatory social attitudes and gender pay gaps prevails even after acounting for the sorting of women and men into different firms and occupations.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Janssen & Simone N. Tuor Sartore & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2014. "Discriminatory Social Attitudes and Varying Gender Pay Gaps within firms," Working Papers 327, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zrh:wpaper:327
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • M5 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics

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