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Economic incentives, home production and gender identity norms

Author

Listed:
  • Ichino, Andrea

    () (European University Institute, U. Bologna and CEPR)

  • Olsson, Martin

    () (Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN, Stockholm) and IFAU)

  • Petrongolo, Barbara

    () (Queen Mary University London, CEP (LSE) and CEPR)

  • Skogman Thoursie, Peter

    () (Stockholm University and IFAU)

Abstract

We infer the role of gender identity norms from the reallocation of childcare across parents, following changes in their relative wages. By exploiting variation from a Swedish tax reform, we estimate the elasticity of substitution in parental childcare for the whole population and for demographic groups potentially adhering to differently binding norms. We find that immigrant, married and male breadwinner couples, as well as couples with a male first-born, react more strongly to tax changes that induce a more traditional allocation of spouses' time, while the respective counterpart couples react more strongly to tax changes that induce a more egalitarian division of labor.

Suggested Citation

  • Ichino, Andrea & Olsson, Martin & Petrongolo, Barbara & Skogman Thoursie, Peter, 2019. "Economic incentives, home production and gender identity norms," Working Paper Series 2019:11, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifauwp:2019_011
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    Cited by:

    1. Petrongolo, Barbara & Ronchi, Maddalena, 2020. "Gender gaps and the structure of local labor markets," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(C).
    2. Azmat, Ghazala & Hensvik, Lena & Rosenqvist, Olof, 2020. "Workplace Presenteeism, Job Substitutability and Gender Inequality," IZA Discussion Papers 13447, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Cristian Alonso & Mariya Brussevich & Era Dabla-Norris & Yuko Kinoshita & Kalpana Kochhar, 2019. "Reducing and Redistributing Unpaid Work: Stronger Policies to Support Gender Equality," IMF Working Papers 19/225, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Tomas Lichard & Filip Pertold & Samuel Skoda, 2020. "Do Women Face a Glass Ceiling at Home? The Division of Household Labor among Dual-Earner Couples," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp662, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Home production; taxes; gender identity; gender gaps.;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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