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Motherhood and flexible jobs: Evidence from Latin American countries

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  • Inés Berniell
  • Lucila Berniell
  • Dolores de la Mata
  • María Edo
  • Mariana Marchionni

Abstract

We study the causal effect of motherhood on labour market outcomes in Latin America by adopting an event study approach around the birth of the first child based on panel data from national household surveys for Chile, Mexico, Peru, and Uruguay. Our main contributions are: (i) providing new and comparable evidence on the effects of motherhood on labour outcomes in developing countries; (ii) exploring the possible mechanisms driving these outcomes; (iii) discussing the potential links between child penalty and the prevailing gender norms and family policies in the region.

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  • Inés Berniell & Lucila Berniell & Dolores de la Mata & María Edo & Mariana Marchionni, 2021. "Motherhood and flexible jobs: Evidence from Latin American countries," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2021-33, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp-2021-33
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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Pedro Eberhard & Javier Fernandez & Catalina Lauer, 2023. "Effects of maternity on labor outcomes and employment quality for women in Chile," Journal of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 2232965-223, December.
    2. Nicolás Francisco Abbate, 2021. "Participación Laboral Femenina y Pre-escolaridad: el impacto de la obligatoriedad de la Sala de 4 en el Trabajo de las Madres," Asociación Argentina de Economía Política: Working Papers 4430, Asociación Argentina de Economía Política.
    3. Inés Berniell & Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni & Mariana Viollaz, 2023. "The role of children and work-from-home in gender labor market asymmetries: evidence from the COVID-19 pandemic in Latin America," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 1191-1214, December.
    4. Mariana Marchionni & Julián Pedrazzi, 2023. "The Last Hurdle? Unyielding Motherhood Effects in the Context of Declining Gender Inequality in Latin America," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0321, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    5. Martina Querejeta, 2022. "Impact of female peer composition on gender norm perceptions and skills formation in secondary school," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2022-28, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Serio Monserrat, 2021. "Mujeres emprendedoras en América Latina: Una mirada sobre la influencia del nivel educativo en la probabilidad de emprender," Asociación Argentina de Economía Política: Working Papers 4522, Asociación Argentina de Economía Política.
    7. Estefanía Galván & Cecilia Parada & Martina Querejeta & Soledad Salvador, 2024. "Gender Gaps and Family Leaves in Latin America," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 387-414, June.

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    Keywords

    child penalty; event study; female labour supply; Self-employment; Informality; Developing countries; Latin America; Gender norms; Family policy;
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