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Worker personality: Another skill bias beyond education in the digital age

Listed author(s):
  • Bode, Eckhardt
  • Brunow, Stephan
  • Ott, Ingrid
  • Sorgner, Alina

We present empirical evidence suggesting that technological progress in the digital age will be biased not only with respect to skills acquired through education but also with respect to noncognitive skills (personality). We measure the direction of technological change by estimated future digitalization probabilities of occupations, and noncognitive skills by the Big Five personality traits from several German worker surveys. Even though we control extensively for education and experience, we find that workers characterized by strong openness and emotional stability tend to be less susceptible to digitalization. Traditional indicators of human capital thus measure workers' skill endowments only imperfectly.

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File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/147984/1/872376877.pdf
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Paper provided by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Economics and Business Engineering in its series Working Paper Series in Economics with number 98.

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Date of creation: 2016
Handle: RePEc:zbw:kitwps:98
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.wiwi.kit.edu/

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