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Identification problems in personality psychology

Author

Listed:
  • Borghans, L.

    (Macro, International & Labour Economics)

  • Golsteyn, B.H.H.

    (Macro, International & Labour Economics)

  • Heckman, J.

    (Externe publicaties SBE)

  • Humphries, J.E.

Abstract

This paper discusses and illustrates identification problems in personality psychology. The measures used by psychologists to infer traits are based on behaviors, broadly defined. These behaviors are produced from multiple traits interacting with incentives in situations. In general, measures are determined by these multiple traits and do not identify any particular trait unless incentives and other traits are controlled for. Using two data sets, we show, as an example, that substantial portions of the variance in achievement test scores and grades, which are often used as measures of cognition, are explained by personality variables.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Borghans, L. & Golsteyn, B.H.H. & Heckman, J. & Humphries, J.E., 2011. "Identification problems in personality psychology," ROA Research Memorandum 004, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:2011004
    DOI: 10.26481/umaror.2011004
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D89 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Other

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