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The costs of illiteracy in South Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Martin Gustafsson

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Servaas van der Berg

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Debra Shepherd

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Cobus Burger

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

Abstract

In South Africa there has been a surge in publicly funded adult literacy education in recent years. There is a recognition that for the effective monitoring of adult literacy, direct measures of literacy are required. Grade attainment, self-reported ability to read and behavioural variables relating to, for instance, reading habits produce vastly different measures of adult literacy in South Africa. It is noteworthy that self-reported values change over time as people’s perceptions of what consitutes literacy shifts. A 75% literacy rate is arguably a plausible figure, though the absence of a direct measure is problematic. An education production function suggests that literacy-related parent behaviour, independently of parent years of education, influences performance of learners in school. In a multivariate employment model, self-reported literacy is a statistically significant predictor of being employed. In a cross-country growth model, poor quality schooling emerges as the variable requiring the most urgent policy attention to sustain and improve South Africa’s economic development. Both microeconomic and macroeconomic estimates suggest that with a more typical level of school performance South Africa’s GDP would be 23% to 30% higher than it currently is.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Gustafsson & Servaas van der Berg & Debra Shepherd & Cobus Burger, 2010. "The costs of illiteracy in South Africa," Working Papers 14/2010, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers113
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    File URL: https://www.ekon.sun.ac.za/wpapers/2010/wp142010/wp-14-2010.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Servaas van der Berg, 2007. "Apartheid's Enduring Legacy: Inequalities in Education-super- 1," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 16(5), pages 849-880, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Debra Shepherd, 2015. "Learn to teach, teach to learn: A within-pupil across-subject approach to estimating the impact of teacher subject knowledge on South African grade 6 performance," Working Papers 01/2015, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Literacy; Illiteracy; South Africa; Education production function; Economic growth;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • D23 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Organizational Behavior; Transaction Costs; Property Rights
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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