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First and Second Generation Impacts of the Biafran War

Listed author(s):
  • Richard Akresh
  • Sonia Bhalotra
  • Marinella Leone
  • Una O. Osili

We analyze long-term impacts of the 1967-1970 Nigerian Civil War, providing the first evidence of intergenerational impacts. Women exposed to the war in their growing years exhibit reduced adult stature, increased likelihood of being overweight, earlier age at first birth, and lower educational attainment. Exposure to a primary education program mitigates impacts of war exposure on education. War exposed men marry later and have fewer children. War exposure of mothers (but not fathers) has adverse impacts on child growth, survival, and education. Impacts vary with age of exposure. For mother and child health, the largest impacts stem from adolescent exposure.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 23721.

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Date of creation: Aug 2017
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23721
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