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Violence and Children’s Education: Evidence from Administrative Data

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  • Duque, Valentina

Abstract

This paper exploits the sharp escalation of violence in Colombia in the 1980s associated with the emergence of drug cartels to provide novel evidence on the long-run effects of violence exposure throughout the life-course, on children’s educational attainment and academic achievement, using administrative data. I find that, a higher homicide rate in early-childhood is associated with a higher probability of school dropout and conditional on completing high school, lower scores on a national end-of-high school exam. Results are robust to several falsification tests, analyses of potential sources of selection bias, and to controlling for family fixed effects. I provide suggestive evidence that changes in fetal, child, and adolescent health outcomes are important potential mechanisms.

Suggested Citation

  • Duque, Valentina, 2019. "Violence and Children’s Education: Evidence from Administrative Data," Working Papers 2019-16, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:syd:wpaper:2019-16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Education; Human capital formation; Early-life shocks; Violence; Parental investments;

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