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Conflict, Educational Attainment and Structural Transformation: La Violencia in Colombia

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  • Leopoldo Fergusson

    ()

  • Ana María Ibáñez

    ()

  • Juan Felipe Riaño

    ()

Abstract

We examine the long-term impact of violence on educational attainment, with evidence from Colombia's La Violencia. Individuals exposed to violence during, and especially before, their schooling years experience a significant and economically meaningful decrease in years of schooling. This impact has consequences beyond human capital accumulation: exposed cohorts engage in activities with less human capital content. Violence thus influenced aggregate development - particularly the process of structural transformation, in which some sectors gain prominence as income increases. The effects result not so much from the direct destruction of physical infrastructure, but from a effected households' responses to the hardships of conflict.

Suggested Citation

  • Leopoldo Fergusson & Ana María Ibáñez & Juan Felipe Riaño, 2015. "Conflict, Educational Attainment and Structural Transformation: La Violencia in Colombia," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 013880, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000089:013880
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    File URL: http://economia.uniandes.edu.co/publicaciones/dcede2015-35.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Civil Conflict; Human Capital; Structural Transformation; Development.;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • D78 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Positive Analysis of Policy Formulation and Implementation
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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