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Learning the hard way: The effect of violent conflict on student academic achievement

Listed author(s):
  • Tilman Brück

    ()

    (International Security and Development Center (ISDC))

  • Michele Di Maio

    ()

    (University of Naples)

  • Sami H. Miaari

    ()

    (Tel-Aviv University)

We study the effect of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict on the probability to pass the final high-school exam for Palestinian students in the West Bank during the Second Intifada (2000-2006). By exploiting within school variation in the number of conflict-related Palestinian fatalities during the academic year, we show that the conflict reduces the probability to pass the final exam and to be admitted to the university. We also provide evidence of the heterogeneous effects of the conflict in terms of ability of the student and type of violent event the student is exposed to. Finally, we discuss possible transmission mechanisms explaining our main result.

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File URL: http://www.hicn.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/HiCN-WP-185.pdf
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Paper provided by Households in Conflict Network in its series HiCN Working Papers with number 185.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2014
Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:185
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.hicn.org

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Steven G. Rivkin & Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain, 2005. "Teachers, Schools, and Academic Achievement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 417-458, 03.
  2. Christine Valente, 2014. "Education and Civil Conflict in Nepal," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 28(2), pages 354-383.
  3. Hani Mansour & Daniel I. Rees, 2011. "The Effect of Prenatal Stress on Birth Weight: Evidence from the al-Aqsa Intifada," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1108, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. David A. Jaeger & M. Daniele Paserman, 2008. "The Cycle of Violence? An Empirical Analysis of Fatalities in the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1591-1604, September.
  5. Catherine rodríguez & fabio sánchez, 2012. "Armed Conflict Exposure, Human Capital Investments, And Child Labor: Evidence From Colombia," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(2), pages 161-184, April.
  6. Andrew J. Houtenville & Karen Smith Conway, 2008. "Parental Effort, School Resources, and Student Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(2), pages 437-453.
  7. Gianmarco León, 2012. "Civil Conflict and Human Capital Accumulation: The Long-term Effects of Political Violence in Perú," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(4), pages 991-1022.
  8. Olaf J. de Groot & Idil Göksel, 2011. "Conflict and Education Demand in the Basque Region," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 55(4), pages 652-677, August.
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