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Education and civil conflict in Nepal

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  • Valente, Christine

Abstract

Between 1996 and 2006, Nepal experienced violent civil conflict as a consequence of a Maoist insurgency, which many argue also brought about an increase in female empowerment. This paper exploits variations in exposure to conflict by birth cohort, survey date, and district to estimate the impact of the insurgency on education outcomes. Overall conflict intensity, measured by conflict casualties, is associated with an increase in female educational attainment, whereas abductions by Maoists, which often targeted school children, have the reverse effect. Male schooling tended to increase more rapidly in areas where the fighting was more intense, but the estimates are smaller in magnitude and more sensitive to specification than estimates for females. Similar results are obtained across different specifications, and robustness checks indicate that these findings are not due to selective migration.

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  • Valente, Christine, 2013. "Education and civil conflict in Nepal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6468, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6468
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jarillo, Brenda & Magaloni, Beatriz & Franco, Edgar & Robles, Gustavo, 2016. "How the Mexican drug war affects kids and schools? Evidence on effects and mechanisms," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 135-146.
    2. Nillesen, Eleonora, 2016. "Empty cups? Assessing the impact of civil war violence on coffee farming in Burundi," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 11(1), March.
    3. Akresh, Richard & Bhalotra, Sonia R. & Leone, Marinella & Osili, Una O., 2017. "First and Second Generation Impacts of the Biafran War," IZA Discussion Papers 10938, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Christine Valente, 2014. "Education and Civil Conflict in Nepal," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 28(2), pages 354-383.
    5. Mamoon, Dawood, 2017. "Building Peace through Education: Case of India and Pakistan Conflict," MPRA Paper 82749, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Roy, Sutanuka & Singh, Prakarsh, 2016. "Gender Bias in Education during Conflict: Evidence from Assam," IZA Discussion Papers 10092, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Valeria Groppo & Kati Kraehnert, 2017. "The impact of extreme weather events on education," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 433-472, April.
    8. Singh, Prakarsh & Shemyakina, Olga N., 2016. "Gender-differential effects of terrorism on education: The case of the 1981–1993 Punjab insurgency," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 185-210.
    9. Vinish Shrestha & Rashesh Shrestha, 2017. "Intergenerational effect of education reform program and maternal education on children's educational and labor outcomes: evidence from Nepal," Departmental Working Papers 2017-07, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    10. Vinish Shrestha & Rashesh Shrestha, 2017. "Intergenerational effect of education reform: mother's education and children's human capital in Nepal," Working Papers 2017-05, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2017.
    11. Richard Akresh, 2016. "Climate Change, Conflict, and Children," HiCN Working Papers 221, Households in Conflict Network.
    12. Justino, Patricia, 2016. "Supply and demand restrictions to education in conflict-affected countries: New research and future agendas," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 76-85.
    13. François Libois, 2016. "Households in Times of War : Adaptation Strategies during the Nepal Civil War," Working Papers 1603, University of Namur, Department of Economics.
    14. Tilman Brück & Michele Di Maio & Sami H. Miaari, 2014. "Learning the hard way: The effect of violent conflict on student academic achievement," HiCN Working Papers 185, Households in Conflict Network.
    15. Swee, Eik Leong, 2015. "On war intensity and schooling attainment: The case of Bosnia and Herzegovina," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 40(PA), pages 158-172.
    16. repec:eee:wdevel:v:96:y:2017:i:c:p:474-489 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Prakarsh Singh & Sutanuka Roy, 2016. "Gender Bias in Education During Conflict Evidence from Assam," NCID Working Papers 09/2016, Navarra Center for International Development, University of Navarra.

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    Keywords

    Primary Education; Population Policies; Education For All; Education and Society; Post Conflict Reconstruction;

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