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Households in Times of War : Adaptation Strategies during the Nepal Civil War

Author

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  • François Libois

    () (CRED, University of Namur)

Abstract

This paper analyses short and medium term consequences of the Nepalese civil war on rural households livelihoods and on the inter-group distribution of income. Conclusions rely on two very rich datasets: the Nepal Living Standards Survey collected before, during and after the war and data on the number of killings by month and village during the eleven years of the conflict. Using the survey timing as a quasi-natural experiment, results indicate that in the short-run all households loose, but high castes by a larger extent. Short-term coping strategies determine medium term diverging recovery paths. Non-high castes allocate more labour in agriculture and loose more in the medium term. High castes diversify their income sources, notably by relying on migration, which allows them to recover.

Suggested Citation

  • François Libois, 2016. "Households in Times of War : Adaptation Strategies during the Nepal Civil War," Working Papers 1603, University of Namur, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:nam:wpaper:1603
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    File URL: http://www.unamur.be/eco/economie/recherche/wpseries/wp/1603.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2016
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jean-Marie Baland & François Libois & Dilip Mookherjee, 2018. "Forest Degradation and Economic Growth in Nepal, 2003–2010," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(2), pages 401-439.
    2. Mitra, Anirban & Mitra, Shabana, 2016. "Redistribution of Economic Resources due to Conflict: The Maoist Uprising in Nepal," MPRA Paper 75545, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Civil war ; Income distribution ; Labour ; Inequality ; Migration ; Nepal;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • N45 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Asia including Middle East

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