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Opium for the Masses? Conflict-Induced Narcotics Production in Afghanistan

Listed author(s):
  • Jo Thori Lind

    (University of Ohio)

  • Karl Ove Moene

    (University of Oslo)

  • Fredik Willumsen

    (University of Oslo)

To explain the rise in Afghan opium production, we explore how rising conflicts change the incentives of farmers. Conflicts make illegal opportunities more profitable as they increase the perceived lawlessness and destroy infrastructure crucial to alternative crops. Exploiting a unique data set, we show that Western hostile casualties, our proxy for conflict, have a strong impact on subsequent local opium production. Using the period after the planting season as a placebo test, we show that conflict has a strong effect before but no effect after planting, indicating causality.

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File URL: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/REST_a_00418
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Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 96 (2014)
Issue (Month): 5 (December)
Pages: 949-966

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:96:y:2014:i:5:p:949-966
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