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LSMS Data Quality in Maoist Influenced Areas of Nepal

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  • Magnus Hatlebakk

Abstract

The first round of the Nepal Living Standards Survey (NLSS1) is a high quality data source that has been applied for a number of empirical studies. Data were collected in 1995/96, prior to the civil war in Nepal. The Maoist party of Nepal started the so called People's war in 1996, and gradually extended their influence in the rural areas. Eight years into the war, in 2003/04, the Central Bureau of Statistics, in collaboration with the World Bank, conducted the second round of the Nepal Living Standards Survey (NLSS2). We investigate to what extent the quality of the NLSS2 data has been affected by the Maoists. We find, if any, only minor support for the hypothesis. Furthermore, the Maoists have less control in the plains (terai), where a majority of the population lives, so data from the terai sub-sample of NLSS2 is, in particular, not likely to be biased by the Maoists.

Suggested Citation

  • Magnus Hatlebakk, 2007. "LSMS Data Quality in Maoist Influenced Areas of Nepal," CMI Working Papers 6, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
  • Handle: RePEc:chm:wpaper:wp2007-6
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    Cited by:

    1. François Libois & Vincent Somville, 2014. "Ungrateful children: migration intensity and remittances in Nepal," CMI Working Papers 8, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    2. Howlader, Aparna & Ando, Amy, 2016. "Consequences of Protected Areas for Forest Extraction and Human Well-being: Evidence from Nepal," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 236117, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Christine Valente, 2011. "What Did the Maoists Ever Do for Us? Education and Marriage of Women Exposed to Civil Conflict in Nepal," HiCN Working Papers 105, Households in Conflict Network.
    4. Libois, François & Somville, Vincent, 2018. "Fertility, household size and poverty in Nepal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 311-322.
    5. Tilman Brück & Patricia Justino & Philip Verwimp & Alexandra Avdeenko & Andrew Tedesco, 2016. "Measuring Violent Conflict in Micro-level Surveys: Current Practices and Methodological Challenges," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 31(1), pages 29-58.
    6. Margarita Pivovarova & Eik Leong Swee, 2012. "Quantifying the Microeconomic Effects of War: How Much Can Panel Data Help?," HiCN Working Papers 116, Households in Conflict Network.
    7. Brück, Tilman & Justino, Patricia & Verwimp, Philip & Avdeenko, Alexandra, 2010. "Identifying Conflict and Violence in Micro-Level Surveys," IZA Discussion Papers 5067, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Tilman Brück & Patricia Justino & Philip Verwimp & Andrew Tedesco & Alexandra Avdeenko, 2013. "Measuring Conflict Exposure in Micro-Level Surveys," HiCN Working Papers 153, Households in Conflict Network.
    9. Cynthia Bansak & Brian Chezum & Animesh Giri, 2015. "Remittances, school quality, and household education expenditures in Nepal," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-19, December.
    10. Pivovarova, Margarita & Swee, Eik Leong, 2015. "Quantifying the Microeconomic Effects of War Using Panel Data: Evidence From Nepal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 308-321.
    11. François Libois, 2016. "Households in Times of War : Adaptation Strategies during the Nepal Civil War," Working Papers 1603, University of Namur, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Household survey Civil war JEL classification: C810; O120;

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