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Conflict and nutrition: endogenous dietary responses in Nepal

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  • Keenan Marchesi

    (USDA-ERS Food Markets Branch)

  • Marc Rockmore

    (US Federal Government)

Abstract

We study the effect of conflict in Nepal on dietary diversity as proxied by food consumption scores (FCS). By comparing pre-violence and peak-violence data and using household fixed effects to address selection into violence, we find that a 100 percent increase in local intensity of violence decreases household FCS by 3 percent. Despite an increase in the diversity of household food production, this is more than offset by the decrease in the diversity of purchased food. These endogenous responses provide potential avenues for policy responses and may be the origins of the oft-reported health shortcoming of exposed populations, particularly children.

Suggested Citation

  • Keenan Marchesi & Marc Rockmore, 2023. "Conflict and nutrition: endogenous dietary responses in Nepal," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 15(1), pages 281-296, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ssefpa:v:15:y:2023:i:1:d:10.1007_s12571-022-01305-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s12571-022-01305-9
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    2. Marta Parigi, 2024. "The effect of violent conflict on calorie consumption and dietary quality in Iraq," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 75(1), pages 341-361, February.

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