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Synchronization patterns in the European Union

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  • Mattia Guerini

    () (GREDEG - Groupe de Recherche en Droit, Economie et Gestion - UNS - Université Nice Sophia Antipolis - UCA - Université Côte d'Azur - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UCA - Université Côte d'Azur , OFCE - OFCE - Sciences Po - Sciences Po, Scuela Superiore Sant'Anna di Pisa)

  • Duc Thi Luu

    (Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel)

  • Mauro Napoletano

    (OFCE - OFCE - Sciences Po - Sciences Po, SKEMA Business School, Scuela Superiore Sant'Anna di Pisa)

Abstract

We propose a novel approach to investigate the synchronization of business cycles and we apply it to a Eurostat database of manufacturing industrial production time-series in the European Union (EU) over the 2000-2017 period. Our approach exploits Random Matrix Theory and extracts the latent information contained in a balanced panel data by cleaning it from possible spurious correlation. We employ this method to study the synchronization among different countries over time. Our empirical exercise tracks the evolution of the European synchronization patterns and identifies the emergence of synchronization clusters among different EU economies. We find that synchronization in the Euro Area increased during the first decade of the century and that it reached a peak during the Great Recession period. It then decreased in the aftermath of the crisis, reverting to the levels observable at the beginning of the 21st century. Second, we show that the asynchronous business cycle dynamics at the beginning of the century was structured along a East-West axis, with eastern European countries having a diverging business cycle dynamics with respect to their western partners. The recession brought about a structural transformation of business cycles co-movements in Europe. Nowadays the divide can be identified along the North vs. South axis. This recent surge in asynchronization might be harmful for the European Union because it implies countries’ heterogeneous responses to common policies.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Mattia Guerini & Duc Thi Luu & Mauro Napoletano, 2019. "Synchronization patterns in the European Union," Working Papers halshs-02375416, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-02375416
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-02375416
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F44 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Business Cycles
    • F45 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Macroeconomic Issues of Monetary Unions

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