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Collateral booms and information depletion

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  • Asriyan, Vladimir
  • Laeven, Luc
  • Martin, Alberto

Abstract

We develop a new theory of information production during credit booms. In our model, entrepreneurs need credit to undertake investment projects, some of which enable them to divert resources towards private consumption. Lenders can protect themselves from such diversion in two ways: collateralization and costly screening, which generates durable information about projects. In equilibrium, the collateralization-screening mix depends on the value of aggregate collateral. High collateral values raise investment and economic activity, but they also raise collateralization at the expense of screening. This has important dynamic implications. During credit booms driven by high collateral values (e.g. real estate booms), the economy accumulates physical capital but depletes information about investment projects. As a result, collateral-driven booms end in deep crises and slow recoveries: when booms end, investment is constrained both by the lack of collateral and by the lack of information on existing investment projects, which takes time to rebuild. We provide new empirical evidence using US firm-level data in support of the model's main mechanism. JEL Classification: E32, E44, G01, D80

Suggested Citation

  • Asriyan, Vladimir & Laeven, Luc & Martin, Alberto, 2019. "Collateral booms and information depletion," Working Paper Series 2266, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20192266
    Note: 261593
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Collateral Booms and Information Depletion
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2018-12-13 15:49:27

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mikel Bedayo & Gabriel Jiménez & José-Luis Peydró & Raquel Vegas, 2020. "Screening and Loan Origination Time: Lending Standards, Loan Defaults and Bank Failures," Working Papers 1215, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    2. Vladimir Asriyan & Luc Laeven & Alberto Martin & Alejandro Van der Ghote & Victoria Vanasco, 2021. "Falling interest rates and credit misallocation: Lessons from general equilibrium," Economics Working Papers 1784, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jul 2021.
    3. Laura Nowzohour & Livio Stracca, 2020. "More Than A Feeling: Confidence, Uncertainty, And Macroeconomic Fluctuations," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(4), pages 691-726, September.
    4. Jaccard, Ivan, 2021. "Leveraged property cycles," Working Paper Series 2539, European Central Bank.
    5. Péter Fáykiss & Erzsébet-Judit Rariga & Márton Zsigó, 2019. "Portfolio Cleaning of Problem Project Loans in Hungary – Experiences Related to the Systemic Risk Buffer, as a Targeted Macroprudential Instrument," Financial and Economic Review, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary), vol. 18(3), pages 52-82.
    6. Matt Darst & Ehraz Refayet & Alexandros Vardoulakis, 2020. "Banks, Non Banks, and Lending Standards," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2020-086, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    collateral; credit booms; crises; information production; misallocation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General

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