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The Asymmetric Effects of Financial Frictions

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  • Guillermo Ordoñez

Abstract

Economic variables move asymmetrically over the business cycle: quickly during crises but slowly during recoveries. I show that this asymmetry is stronger in countries with less developed financial systems and greater financial frictions. Then I explain this fact using a learning model with endogenous information about economic conditions. Financial frictions, which I capture by higher bankruptcy costs, magnify the reaction of lending rates and economic activity to negative shocks and then delay their recovery by restricting information after the crisis. Empirical evidence and a quantitative exploration of the model show that this explanation is consistent with the data.

Suggested Citation

  • Guillermo Ordoñez, 2013. "The Asymmetric Effects of Financial Frictions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 121(5), pages 844-895.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:doi:10.1086/673886
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    Cited by:

    1. Ambrocio, Gene, 2017. "The real effects of overconfidence and fundamental uncertainty shocks," Research Discussion Papers 37/2017, Bank of Finland.
    2. Nicholas Bloom & Fatih Guvenen & Sergio Salgado, 2016. "Skewed Business Cycles," 2016 Meeting Papers 1621, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Geert Bekaert & Alexander Popov, 2012. "On the Link Between the Volatility and Skewness of Growth," NBER Working Papers 18556, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Evelyn Wamboye & Rajen Mookerjee, 2014. "Financial development and manufactured exports: the African experience," International Journal of Economic Policy in Emerging Economies, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 7(1), pages 22-34.
    5. Gene Ambrocio, . "Rational exuberance booms," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Ferrari, Massimo, 2014. "The financial meltdown: a model with endogenous default probability," MPRA Paper 59419, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D53 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Financial Markets
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G33 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Bankruptcy; Liquidation

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