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Interest-Rate Liberalization and Capital Misallocations

Author

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  • Zheng Liu
  • Pengfei Wang
  • Zhiwei Xu

Abstract

We study the consequences of interest-rate liberalization in a two-sector general equilibrium model of China. The model captures a key feature of China's distorted financial system: state-owned enterprises (SOEs) have greater incentive to expand production and easier access to credit than private firms. In this second-best environment, liberalizing interest rate controls improves capital allocations within each sector, but exacerbates misallocations across sectors. Under calibrated parameters, interest-rate liberalization may reduce aggregate productivity and welfare, unless other policy reforms are also implemented to alleviate SOEs' distorted incentives or improve private firms' credit access.

Suggested Citation

  • Zheng Liu & Pengfei Wang & Zhiwei Xu, 2017. "Interest-Rate Liberalization and Capital Misallocations," Working Paper Series 2017-15, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, revised 01 May 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfwp:2017-15
    DOI: 10.24148/wp2017-15
    Note: Date of publication: May 2017.
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Devereux, Michael B & Smith, Gregor W, 1994. "International Risk Sharing and Economic Growth," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 35(3), pages 535-550, August.
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    3. Kaiji Chen & Jue Ren & Tao Zha, 2018. "The Nexus of Monetary Policy and Shadow Banking in China," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 108(12), pages 3891-3936, December.
    4. Yong Wang & Xuewen Liu & Xi Li, 2013. "A Model of China's State Capitalism," 2013 Meeting Papers 853, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Abiad, Abdul & Oomes, Nienke & Ueda, Kenichi, 2008. "The quality effect: Does financial liberalization improve the allocation of capital?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 270-282, October.
    6. Benjamin Moll, 2014. "Productivity Losses from Financial Frictions: Can Self-Financing Undo Capital Misallocation?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(10), pages 3186-3221, October.
    7. Francisco J. Buera & Benjamin Moll, 2015. "Aggregate Implications of a Credit Crunch: The Importance of Heterogeneity," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 1-42, July.
    8. Xi Li & Xuewen Liu & Yong Wang, 2015. "A Model of China's State Capitalism," HKUST IEMS Working Paper Series 2015-12, HKUST Institute for Emerging Market Studies, revised Feb 2015.
    9. Bai, Chong-En & Li, David D. & Tao, Zhigang & Wang, Yijiang, 2000. "A Multitask Theory of State Enterprise Reform," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 716-738, December.
    10. Chang, Chun & Liu, Zheng & Spiegel, Mark M. & Zhang, Jingyi, 2019. "Reserve requirements and optimal Chinese stabilization policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 33-51.
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    12. Hongyi Chen & Qianying Chen & Stefan Gerlach, 2011. "The Implementation of Monetary Policy in China: The Interbank Market and Bank Lending," Working Papers 262011, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Song, Zheng (Michael) & Xiong, Wei, 2018. "Risks in China’s financial system," BOFIT Discussion Papers 1/2018, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    2. Chang, Chun & Liu, Zheng & Spiegel, Mark M. & Zhang, Jingyi, 2019. "Reserve requirements and optimal Chinese stabilization policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 33-51.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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