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The Nexus of Monetary Policy and Shadow Banking in China

Author

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  • Kaiji Chen
  • Jue Ren
  • Tao Zha

Abstract

We estimate the quantity-based monetary policy system in China. We argue that China's rising shadow banking was inextricably linked to banks' balance-sheet risk and hampered the effectiveness of monetary policy on the banking system during the 2009-2015 period of monetary policy contractions. By constructing two micro datasets at the individual bank level, we substantiate this argument with three empirical findings: (1) in response to monetary policy tightening, nonstate banks actively engaged in intermediating shadow banking products; (2) these banks, in sharp contrast to state banks, brought shadow banking products onto the balance sheet via risky investments; (3) bank loans and risky investment assets in the banking system respond in opposite directions to monetary policy tightening, which makes monetary policy less effective. We build a theoretical framework to derive the above testable hypotheses and explore implications of the interaction between monetary and regulatory policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Kaiji Chen & Jue Ren & Tao Zha, 2017. "The Nexus of Monetary Policy and Shadow Banking in China," NBER Working Papers 23377, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23377
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Juan F. Rubio-Ramírez & Daniel F. Waggoner & Tao Zha, 2010. "Structural Vector Autoregressions: Theory of Identification and Algorithms for Inference," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(2), pages 665-696.
    2. Gabriel Jiménez & Steven Ongena & José‐Luis Peydró & Jesús Saurina, 2014. "Hazardous Times for Monetary Policy: What Do Twenty‐Three Million Bank Loans Say About the Effects of Monetary Policy on Credit Risk‐Taking?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82(2), pages 463-505, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Liu, Zheng & Wang, Pengfei & Xu, Zhiwei, 2017. "Interest-Rate Liberalization and Capital Misallocations," Working Paper Series 2017-15, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    2. Hongyi Chen & Ran Li & Peter Tillmann, 2018. "Pushing on a String: State-Owned Enterprises and Monetary Policy Transmission in China," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201806, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    3. repec:eee:chieco:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:110-122 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E02 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Institutions and the Macroeconomy
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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