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The Effect of High School Employment on Educational Attainment : A Conditional Difference-in-Differences Approach

  • Franz Buscha

    (Crest)

  • Arnaud Maurel

    (Crest)

  • Lionel Page

    (Crest)

  • Stefan Speckesser

    (Crest)

Using American panel data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 this paperinvestigates the effect of working during full-time education on attainment. In particular the focus ison students in the twelfth grade of high school. By employing a propensity score matching approachcombined with difference-in-difference methods we attempt to overcome problems of sample selectionand unobserved heterogeneity in order to estimate an unbiased effect of working during highschool. Results indicate that once such factors are controlled for, little to no effect on reading andmath scores are found. Neither do we find evidence of a negative impact for those who work longhours per week. We thus argue that working during schooling (twelfth grade) has little detrimentalimpact on grades per se.

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Paper provided by Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique in its series Working Papers with number 2007-40.

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Length: 33
Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:crs:wpaper:2007-40
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  1. Dustmann, C. & Rajah, N. & van Soest, A.H.O., 1996. "Part-Time Work, School Success and School Leaving," Discussion Paper 1996-43, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  2. Orley Ashenfelter & David Card, 1984. "Using the Longitudinal Structure of Earnings to Estimate the Effect of Training Programs," Working Papers 554, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  3. Anna Sanz-de-Galdeano & Daniela Vuri, 2007. "Parental Divorce and Students' Performance: Evidence from Longitudinal Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(3), pages 321-338, 06.
  4. Michael, Robert T & Tuma, Nancy Brandon, 1984. "Youth Employment: Does Life Begin at 16?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(4), pages 464-76, October.
  5. John H. Tyler, 2003. "Using State Child Labor Laws to Identify the Effect of School-Year Work on High School Achievement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 353-380, April.
  6. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Daniel R. Sherman, 1985. "Employment While in College, Academic Achievement and Post-College Outcomes: A Summary of Results," NBER Working Papers 1742, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Donna S. Rothstein, 2007. "High School Employment and Youths' Academic Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(1).
  8. Alberto Abadie & Guido W. Imbens, 2008. "On the Failure of the Bootstrap for Matching Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 76(6), pages 1537-1557, November.
  9. Christopher J. Ruhm, 1995. "Is High School Employment Consumption or Investment?," NBER Working Papers 5030, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Ralph Stinebrickner & Todd R. Stinebrickner, 2003. "Working during School and Academic Performance," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 449-472, April.
  11. Richard Dorsett, 2005. "Unemployed couples: the labour market effects of making both partners search for work," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 168(2), pages 365-385.
  12. repec:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-355917 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Claude Montmarquette & Nathalie Viennot-Briot & Marcel Dagenais, 2007. "Dropout, School Performance, and Working while in School," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(4), pages 752-760, November.
  14. Jeffrey Smith & Petra Todd, 2003. "Does Matching Overcome Lalonde's Critique of Nonexperimental Estimators?," University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity Working Papers 20035, University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity.
  15. Gerald S. Oettinger, 1999. "Does high school employment affect high school academic performance?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(1), pages 136-151, October.
  16. Alex Bryson & Richard Dorsett & Susan Purdon, 2002. "The use of propensity score matching in the evaluation of active labour market policies," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4993, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  17. James Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Jeffrey Smith & Petra Todd, 1998. "Characterizing Selection Bias Using Experimental Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(5), pages 1017-1098, September.
  18. Heckman, James J. & Lalonde, Robert J. & Smith, Jeffrey A., 1999. "The economics and econometrics of active labor market programs," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 31, pages 1865-2097 Elsevier.
  19. Zvi Eckstein & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 1999. "Why Youths Drop Out of High School: The Impact of Preferences, Opportunities, and Abilities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(6), pages 1295-1340, November.
  20. Bergemann, Annette & Fitzenberger, Bernd & Speckesser, Stefan, 2005. "Evaluating the Dynamic Employment Effects of Training Programs in East Germany Using Conditional Difference-in-Differences," IZA Discussion Papers 1848, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  21. Robert H. Meyer & David A. Wise, 1979. "High School Preparation and Early Labor Force Experience," NBER Working Papers 0342, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  22. Steinberg, Laurence D. & Greenberger, Ellen, 1980. "The part-time employment of high school students: A research agenda," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 2(1-2), pages 159-183.
  23. Heckman, James J & Ichimura, Hidehiko & Todd, Petra, 1998. "Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(2), pages 261-94, April.
  24. repec:dgr:kubcen:199643 is not listed on IDEAS
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